domingo, 28 de febrero de 2016

'Holy Grail' Beatles record to be auctioned

www.bbc.com
'Holy Grail' Beatles record to be auctioned
BBC NEWS
26 February 2016

First Beatles record
The 78 RPM record was the first Beatles disc to be cut

An extremely rare and valuable Beatles record that was found languishing in a loft is to be auctioned next month.

Described as "a Holy Grail item", the 1962 10-inch record of Till There Was You and Hello Little Girl lay forgotten in the home of Les Maguire for decades.

Maguire, the keyboardist in fellow Liverpool act Gerry and the Pacemakers, said it could be seen as the record "that sparked The Beatles' success".

The acetate bears the handwriting of the Fab Four's manager Brian Epstein.

'One-off'
A conservative estimate is that the 78 RPM record - the first Beatles disc to be cut before the band broke through into the national charts in late 1962 - will fetch upwards of £10,000 when it is auctioned, although it is such a rare item it is difficult to predict what the sale price will be.

The record of Till There was You - mislabelled by Epstein as 'Til There was You and described as being the work of "Paul McCartney & The Beatles" - was made at the HMV store in Oxford Street, London.
It was presented to future Beatles producer George Martin at the EMI record label in a bid to secure the band a recording contract.

Hello Little Girl, on the other side, which was again mislabelled by Epstein - as Hullo Little Girl - was described as being the work of "John Lennon & The Beatles".
Maguire, 74, of Formby, Merseyside, was given the disc by Epstein in 1963 after it had been returned to him by Martin.

Gerry and the Pacemakers
The record was kept in the loft of the home of Les Maguire (far left) for more than 50 years

Maguire described the record as "a special piece" and "a one-off".

"I've never been a big fan of memorabilia, but people seem to like it," he said.

"It's no good to me so I've given it to my granddaughter, who is hoping to buy a house after passing her accountancy exams. I hope it goes for a good price."

The record is being sold for the first time, having been locked away in Maguire's loft, carefully wrapped in paper, for more than 50 years.

Beatles
The Beatles went on to record 17 UK number one singles

Beatles historian Mark Lewisohn said in his book, Tune In, that the uniqueness of the disc is "enhanced by Brian Epstein's handwriting on the labels, and the recognition of what it led to".

Despite initial reticence from Martin, The Beatles would sign to EMI in 1962 before going on to become one of the most successful and influential bands of all time.

The recording is, Lewisohn wrote, one of the "rarest and most collectable of all Beatles records".

Ian Shirley, editor of Record Collector Rare Record Price Guide, described the disc as a "Holy Grail item".

Beatles' first record
Till There Was You was written by Meredith Willson in 1957

He said it would "fascinate Beatles collectors worldwide" and would "no doubt attract bids from those with deep pockets".

The sale is to take place at Omega Auctions in Warrington on 22 March and will be broadcast live online for worldwide bidding.






www.omegaauctions.co.uk
The Beatles Auction 2016

Tuesday 22nd March 2016: The Beatles Collection
Venue: Warrington Auction Room 
Viewing: Monday 21st March 11.00am - 6.00pm
Viewing: Tuesday 22nd March 9.00am - 12.00pm
Fianl closing date for entries: 4th March

We have some fabulous items in this sale including the 'holy grail' demo record as reported on BBC:

THE RECORD THAT LAUNCHED THE BEATLES

Rare Beatles Demo Disc

One of the rarest and most collectable of all Beatles records is expected to sell for over £10,000 when it comes up for sale next month. The unique ten-inch 78RPM acetate record featuring ‘Hello Little Girl’ on one side and ‘Till There Was You’ on the other was cut at the HMV record store on Oxford St London before being presented by the group’s manager Brian Epstein to George Martin (EMI) in his desperate attempt to get them a recording contract. This meeting, despite Martin’s initial reticence, was to eventually lead to the breakthrough they were looking for. 

In his book Tune In, the leading Beatles historian Mark Lewisohn said of the disc, ‘Its uniqueness is enhanced by Brian Epstein’s handwriting on the labels, and the recognition of what it led to – making it one of the rarest and most collectable of all Beatles records.’

According to Ian Shirley, Record Collector Rare Record Price Guide Editor “This is one of those Holy Grail items like the original Quarrymen acetate that the band recorded themselves. This acetate is a unique item that, in many respects, helped Brain Epstein to start the ball rolling to musical world domination. It will fascinate Beatles collectors worldwide and no doubt attract bids from those with deep pockets.”

The record is being sold by Omega Auctions of Warrington on behalf of Les Maguire of Gerry and the Pacemakers. He was given it by Brian Epstein in 1963 after the disc had been returned to him by George Martin. This is the first time it has come to the marketplace, having been locked away in Maguire’s loft until now.


Full press release for Beatles acetate :

THE RECORD THAT LAUNCHED THE BEATLES
One of the rarest and most collectable of all Beatles records is expected to sell for over 
£10,000 when it comes up for sale next month. The unique ten-inch 78RPM acetate record 
featuring ‘Hello Little Girl’ on one side and ‘Till There Was You’ on the other was pressed at 
the HMV record store on Oxford St London before being presented by the group’s manager 
Brian Epstein to George Martin (EMI) in his desperate attempt to get them a recording 
contract. This meeting, despite Martin’s initial reticence, was to eventually lead to the 
breakthrough they were looking for.
In his book Tune In, the leading Beatles historian Mark Lewisohn said of the disc, ‘Its 
uniqueness is enhanced by Brian Epstein’s handwriting on the labels, and the recognition of 
what it led to – making it one of the rarest and most collectable of all Beatles records.’
According to Ian Shirley, Record Collector Rare Record Price Guide Editor “This is one 
of those Holy Grail items like the original Quarrymen acetate that the band recorded 
themselves. This acetate is a unique item that, in many respects, helped Brain Epstein to 
start  the ball rolling to musical world domination. It will fascinate Beatles collectors 
worldwide and  no doubt attract bids from those with deep pockets.”
The record is being sold by Omega Auctions of Warrington on behalf of Les Maguire of 
Gerry and the Pacemakers. He was given it by Brian Epstein in 1963 after the disc had 
been  returned to him by George Martin. This is the first time it has come to the 
marketplace, having  been locked away in Maguire’s loft until now.

Background information
Extracted with permission from Tune In by Mark Lewisohn (volume one of The Beatles: All 
These Years), pages 1105–1108. Text © Mark Lewisohn

Brian’s April 1961 visit to Hamburg and Hanover as a guest of Deutsche Grammophon had 
already proven fruitful in getting My Bonnie released in Britain, and now it paid dividends 
a second time.
Another delegate on the course was Robert Boast, manager of His Master’s Voice (HMV), the selfproclaimed world’s largest record store, situated on Oxford Street in the heart of London. 
After Decca’s rejection, Brian took the opportunity to renew Boast’s acquaintance; he had no obvious plan in mind, but Boast was an address-book contact and he was exploring every 
possibility. Brian had with him the Beatles’ Decca tape and sat in Boast’s office saying his 
boys would become very big stars if only someone would take a chance with them.
‘He said he’d had a very wearing two days visiting record companies. It seems they just 
weren’t prepared to listen. I was, though it was beyond my powers to help him. But at that 
time we had a small recording studio on the first floor, where budding artists could make 
78rpm demonstration discs. I took Brian there and introduced him to our disc cutter, Jim 
Foy.’
It made sense for Brian to pitch the Beatles from discs rather than a reel of tape. Every 
recording manager had an office gramophone (as they were still called), not everyone had 
a tape deck. The first floor at HMV included the Personal Recording Department, a smart 
counter beyond which customers could make one-strike records of personal greetings. 
Musicians used it too (the room contained a grand piano) and it was here, in 1958, that 
Cliff Richard recorded Lawdy Miss Clawdy c/w Breathless, which prompted Norrie Paramor 
to sign him to EMI’s Columbia label.
Jim Foy and Brian Epstein chatted while a lathe cut the Beatles’ sound into 78rpm acetate 
discs of heavy black lacquer. As Foy would remember:
‘I remarked that the tape sounded very good, to which he replied, rather proudly, that some 
of the songs were actually written by the group, which was uncommon. I asked whether they 
had been published, and when he said they hadn’t I told him that the office of Ardmore and Beechwood, one of EMI’s music publishing companies, was on the top floor of the shop. 
Should I fetch the general manager, Sid Colman? He said yes, Sid came down, listened to 
the tape and he too expressed interest. When I’d done the cutting, he and Brian went back 
up  to the office.’
It was here that the Beatles’ Decca recording of three Lennon-McCartney Originals turned 
up trumps.
If they hadn’t sung those songs, Brian would not have been sitting in an oak-panelled, 
fourth-floor office over the hum and thrum of Oxford Street, having his first discussion 
about an element of the business still little known to him. He knew record companies and 
enjoyed memorising their catalogue numbers and titles, but music publishers were just 
names on record labels or sheet music, familiar in themselves while their workings, the 
business strategies behind them, were not.
At fifty-six, Sid Colman was a wise old bird of the song trade, in the business since 1937 
and now installed by EMI as general manager of its publishing operation. As Decca had 
Burlington Music and Philips had Flamingo Music so EMI had Ardmore and Beechwood, 
formed in 1958 as an extension of Capitol Records’ publishing businesses. Whatever the 
country, the idea was the same: owning music copyrights reaped a tidy income, and so 
much the better if it was from the company’s own record product and every revenue stream 
flowed into the same pool.
Colman was interested in Ardmore and Beechwood publishing these Lennon-McCartney 
songs, which was good news … except that Brian wanted a Beatles recording contract. A 
publisher would give the songs to someone else to record and he wanted the Beatles to 
have first use of them. Colman understood and told Brian he’d see what he could do to 
help; in return, Brian gave his word that if Colman could assist in obtaining the Beatles 
a recording contract, Ardmore and Beechwood would get the publishing.
Precisely what propelled Brian from here to the office of George Martin may never be known. George would always say, naturally, that Colman picked up the phone, told him about Brian 
and suggested they meet, but Colman’s indispensable right-hand-man throughout this 
period, a music plugger who called himself Kim Bennett, insists this was not the case, 
and that  George was the very last person Colman would have called because he strongly 
disliked him. Whatever the reason, George Martin’s desk diary for 13 February 1962 
includes Judy  Lockhart Smith’s lightly-pencilled untimed entry for ‘Bernard Epstein’.
Brian was chancing his arm at EMI, trying to wrest a Yes where there’d been a No. 
The recording managers had already turned down the Beatles on the basis of their 
appearance  on the Tony Sheridan disc; Brian must have been hoping this wouldn’t be 
remembered,  and that he might score a better result with a personal approach and 
different product. 
It could also be that he was after any appointment at EMI House and George Martin 
was the only man available – two of his three A&R colleagues, Norman Newell and Norrie 
Paramor, were on holiday this week.
George wasn’t there when Brian arrived, so the first person he met was Judy. She would 
always remember appreciating how well-dressed, well-mannered and well-spoken he was, 
not at all like the other managers who came into the office, while Brian would later write, 
genuinely, of how he and Judy developed ‘an instant friendship.’
George’s day was filled with appointments, and when he arrived he wouldn’t have been able 
to give his visitor much time. The two sat across a desk – one man aged thirty-six, the other 
twenty-seven, both in smart suits and ties, and with polite, cultured voices that had 
benefited  from selfimprovement.
Brian was desperate but trying not to seem so, George was tolerant, pleasant and in a
position of power. Brian told him about the Beatles, saying how big they were in Liverpool 
and affecting surprise when George said he hadn’t heard of them. This somewhat riled his 
host: as George would reflect, ‘I almost asked him in reply where Liverpool was – the 
thought of anything coming out of the provinces was extraordinary.’
By interpreting the way Brian remembered the meeting, there was probably time to hear only 
one of his new-cut records – a ten-inch 78 acetate with Hello Little Girl on one side and 
Till There Was You on the other. He’d written the essential details on the labels in blue 
fountain-pen. With limited space, and constantly keen to demonstrate the Beatles had more 
than one singer, he wrote that Hullo Little Girl [sic] was John Lennon & The Beatles – 
adding too the songwriting credit Lennon, McCartney – and that Til There Was You [sic] 
was Paul McCartney & The Beatles. Brian’s recollection two years later was:
‘George liked Hello Little Girl, Till There Was You. Liked George on guitar. Thought Paul 
was the one for discs’.
It would be a long time before anyone else got to hear the Decca recording of Till There 
Was You, and express wonderment first that Brian had selected it – this was the number 
where John said Paul ‘sounded like a woman’ and Pete’s timing was all over the place – 
and second that George Martin, from this, thought Paul best for recording and liked 
George Harrison’s guitar playing. This was perhaps George’s worst guitar work of the 
day. (Hello Little Girl was reasonable, though.)
If this isn’t perplexing enough, George Martin would remember the meeting quite differently. 
In his first lengthy quote on the subject – a Melody Maker interview nine years later – he 
specifically mentioned Your Feet’s Too Big being on the tape [sic] Brian played him, and 
added, ‘I wasn’t knocked out at all – it was a pretty lousy tape, recorded in a back room, 
very badly balanced, not very good songs and a rather raw group.’ This strongly suggests 
he wasn’t listening to the Beatles’ Decca test but a recording of which nothing else is known.
The meeting came to an end with George not ‘knocked out at all.’ He kept the acetate and 
might have said he would get in touch if he was interested in hearing more, but he wasn’t 
and he didn’t. It was just another disappointing encounter for Brian, one of way too many 
for his liking. He was having a far harder job selling the Beatles than expected.

Auction Details
Omega Auctions
Unit 3B Penketh Business Park
66-70 Liverpool Rd
Great Sankey
Warrington

Contact:
Karen Fairweather
01925 873040

www.omegaauctions.co.uk
Auction: The Beatles Collection
Date: 22nd March 2016

Bidding live from the saleroom in Warrington but also broadcast live online worldwide for 
worldwide bidding







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