jueves, 18 de octubre de 2018

The Farr Side: Paul McCartney continues to shine








































www.statesman.com
The Farr Side: Paul McCartney continues to shine
By David T. Farr More Content Now
Austin American-Statesman
Posted oct 18 2018



It has been a few years since I was excited about new music from Paul McCartney. His new album, “Egypt Station,” is awesome.

It debuted at No. 1 on Billboard’s Hot 200. The new single, “Come On To Me,” is one of his best tracks in years.

McCartney is one of the all-time greats. I’m happy to see him having such success at age 76, especially knowing all the talented artists we’ve lost over the past few years.

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This new record is going to appease McCartney fans, but also those diehard Beatles fan who didn’t truly embrace his efforts outside of the band.

He’s a legend and not just because of his Beatles fame. I’ve said this before and will say it again — I liked the Beatles and all of their incredible music, but I became an even bigger fan of their solo work.

For me, the artistry only grew Paul, John, George and even Ringo. For Paul, it grew when he sprouted Wings.

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I appreciated the collaborative work with his late wife, Linda, and some songs that emerged like “With A Little Luck” and “Band On The Run.” His solo projects, even after Wings, made me like him more, especially the albums “Tug Of War” and “Pipes Of Peace.” The singles “Coming Up,” “Maybe I’m Amazed,” “Take It Away,” “So Bad,” “My Brave Face,” “Press” and my most favorite McCartney track, “No More Lonely Nights,” from the film “Give My Regards To Broad Street,” are some of his best.

His duets of “Ebony and Ivory” with Stevie Wonder and “The Girl Is Mine” and “Say, Say, Say” with Michael Jackson showcased his versatility.

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“Egypt Station” is his 17th post-Beatles album. If you listen closely, you can hear echoes of “Sgt. Pepper” on the beginning of “People Want Peace.” The interlude finds Paul saying, “Ladies and gentlemen, I’m standing before you with something important to say ...”

Over the past year, you’ve probably seen McCartney a little more than usual. He revisited Abbey Road and too part in “Carpool Karaoke” with James Cordan.

His music has long evoked a message of love, peace and honesty, but the new material takes it a notch further, especially “Fuh You,” co-written by OneRepublic’s Ryan Tedder.

“Happy With You” is a sweet number about the one you’re with. “Back In Brazil” flavors his love for other cultures.

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I like the pop sound of “Do It Now” and “Dominoes” and the pep-talk message on bullying from “Who Cares.” Paul sings, “Who cares what the idiots say/Who cares what the idiots do/Who cares about the pain in your heart/Who cares? I do..” I think he’s spot-on with that.

If you haven’t checked out “Come On To Me,” do so. You’re gonna love it.


— David T. Farr can be reached at farrboy@hotmail.com.


Image result for Paul McCartney shines on



miércoles, 17 de octubre de 2018

Paul McCartney Talks Beatles Secrets, New Album & More for iHeartRadio's 'Inside the Studio': Listen
















www.billboard.com
Paul McCartney Talks Beatles Secrets, New Album & More for iHeartRadio's 'Inside the Studio': Listen
by Marina Pedrosa
10/16/2018


Paul McCartney
Mary McCartney

In a very candid interview with iHeartRadio's Inside the Studio on Tuesday (Oct. 16), Sir Paul McCartney spilled the tea on some of the legendary stories and secrets of his emblematic career. From his Beatles days to living a normal life after nearly 60 years of fame, Sir Paul opened up about his long musical journey, proving once again that age is simply a number.

Despite of being one of the most famous rock stars in the world, McCartney insists that he lives a normal life -- the only difference is that he gets recognized now. "I walk down streets. They're for walking down. I like to get out and about and people say, 'Oh no, you've got to have acres of security behind you and stuff,' but I like to just get out, just so as you feel like yourself, instead of like a rock star. So I like to just get out like I always did when I was a kid. It keeps me sane. I've got quite a lot of freedom, actually, and I value it."

Although success came early for The Beatles, McCartney is still filled with constant motivation and stimulus -- ironically, that same early period of his career is also one of the biggest sources of inspiration. "Even when we were like maybe 20, 24 years old or something, at the height of The Beatles, we often would try to work out something on a song or what we were gonna do with a recording, we'd often say, 'What would we have done when we were 17?' And we'd check back to our 17-year-old selves, who we thought were the coolest people in the world. It's your formative period, it's when you get a lot of your ideas, and in my case if you're writing songs, those memories are very rich wells of inspiration," he shared.

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Still, the 76-year-old makes sure to remember his roots: This year, he played a show at his old school and at the Cavern Club in Liverpool, England, where everything started. "It made it fun, interesting and each little thing was different, so it was great. Yeah, Cavern were happy and I was happy with the ideas we were cooking up together. As long as they were good ideas that were exciting everyone, we had a blast."

Laying out the creative process for his newest No. 1 record Egypt Station, Sir Paul shared his experience of working with both Greg Kurstin and Ryan Tedder. "When I was working with Greg, which was most of the time, I had a lot of songs I wanted to record. So I came in and we worked on them together, but they were ready written. Then there was a period there where Greg couldn't work, but I had a couple weeks off so I took one of the weeks as a holiday and then the other week, my manager said, 'Do you want to keep the momentum going? You're on a bit of a roll here, and if you want to keep it going, I can suggest other people you might work with.' So he sent me a few suggestions."

Soon came Ryan Tedder, who ended up being a perfect match for the new album. "I liked what I was hearing that Ryan was doing. I didn't know much about him. I phoned him up and we had a great conversation, so I said, 'Well, come to my studio in England and we'll just figure it out. We'll just think of something.' So I said, 'I've got a couple of songs. We could do these.' He said, 'No, no. Let's just make it up.' We didn't have long. We just had the seven days, it might have even been five days. So we just made them up and we ended up making up three tracks."

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On the endless Beatles stereotypes, the "Yesterday" singer defined the quartet as "four corners of a square" -- all constantly embracing each other's traits and qualities. "You'll get that John was the dark one, Paul was the cute one, and that's not true, because we each had a bit of that or the other. George could be very much the one who'd bring that. When I'm talking about it, I always use that example of the song "Getting Better." I go, 'It's getting better all the time,' and John goes, 'Couldn't get much worse,' so you know, that's a good example of how we would do that. Often it could be George who'd do it just as much as John would, and I think I would sometimes take John's songs and darken them. We had those kind of influences on each other," he explains.

"The story sticks that John was the dark one, I was the light one, George was the mystic one, you know. To some degree that's true, but we each had aspects of all those kind of forces, and Ringo too."

Listen to Paul McCartney's full interview on Inside the Studio below.





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martes, 16 de octubre de 2018

Exclusive First Look: iHeart Podcast Goes 'Inside The Studio' With Paul McCartney















www.forbes.com
Exclusive First Look: iHeart Podcast Goes 'Inside The Studio' With Paul McCartney
Steve Baltin
Contributor
Hollywood & Entertainment
Oct 16, 2018


AUSTIN, TX - OCTOBER 05: Paul McCartney performs during the 2018 Austin City Limits Music Festival at Zilker Park on October 5, 2018 in Austin, Texas. (Photo by Tim Mosenfelder/Getty Images)

For the latest episode of their "Inside The Studio" podcast, host Joe Levy and the iHeartMedia team made a very special trip to meet with Paul McCartney in Winnipeg surrounding a show on his current tour in support of his chart-topping Egypt Station album.

Paul McCartney telling stories about John Lennon, George Harrison and Ringo Starr, sharing secrets from the Beatles in the studio, on living a normal life while being one of the most famous people in the world and more is every bit the magic you would expect.

This is Paul McCartney on "Get Back," on "Penny Lane," on Sgt. Peppers, on "Blackbird." Just enjoy.

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On Climate Change:

Paul McCartney: I think everyone, like me, who believes in climate change, and that's a lot of people, we're looking at these climate accords and these meetings, there was one in Japan, there was one in Copenhagen, and as these came up we'd all be looking at it and going, "Oh, this will be the one. We're going to do something about it. Everyone's going to get together, all the nations are going to agree that we've got to figure it out." And then it would fail. "Ah, I don't believe it. America and China didn't sign it." And it was so disappointing that finally when Paris arrived, it was like, "Yay, I can't believe it." And then Trump pulls out of it, it's like, "Ooooo ... " see now, that was like really disappointing. But the thing is, as far as I'm concerned, it's a reality. I don't think there's any doubt about that. We're getting this freak weather. And you could say, as some people who deny climate change say, "Well, you know, there's always been freak weather." But I believe scientists. They study a bit harder than I do. The science does indicate that if you warm up the planet, you're going to get these effects.

On Living A Normal Life:

I walk down streets. They're for walking down. I like to get out and about and people say, "Oh no, you've got to have acres of security behind you and stuff," but I like to just get out,  just so as you feel like yourself, instead of like a rock star. So I like to just get out like I always did when I was a kid. It keeps me sane. And it's the same feeling as when I was a kid, just walking around. The only difference is I get recognized. Everyone reaches in their pocket immediately for their phones. But, I've got quite a lot of freedom, actually, and I value it.

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On Success Then And Now:

The Beatles, even when we were like maybe 20, 24 years old or something, at the height of The Beatles, we often would try to work out something on a song or what we were gonna do with a recording, we'd often say, "What would we have done when we were 17?" And we'd check back to our 17-year-old selves, who we thought were the coolest opinion in the world. You'll always refer to that period. It's your formative period, it's when you get a lot of your ideas, and in my case if you're writing songs, those memories are very rich wells of inspiration. So I can just think, "I remember walking along the road with our guitars on our backs, me and John, just before we were famous." Writing letters to people, "Dear Sir, we are a rock combo and we would love to play at your place." All that sort of stuff. It's kind of like magic for me. I think also because of how far I've come, so you got that very early innocent period and then we get famous with The Beatles, but before that we go to Hamburg, as you say, and then we get famous with The Beatles, and then we get the American fame and then we make records and we go through our various phases, so it's a long, long, long journey and then right now, here I am, making a new album, Egypt Station, and lo and behold, it goes to number one in America. You can imagine we're partying. That night was a party.

On Going Back To His Roots:

We did the Cavern. We went back to my old school and did a little concert there. It made it fun. It made it interesting and each little thing was different, and so it was great. Yeah, Cavern were happy and I was happy with the ideas we were cooking up together. As long as they were good ideas that were exciting everyone, we had a blast.

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On Working With Greg Kurstin And Ryan Tedder On New Album:

When I was working with Greg, which was most of the time, I had a lot of songs I wanted to record. So I came in and we worked on them together, but they were ready written. Then there was a period there where Greg couldn't work, but I had a couple weeks off so I took one of the weeks as a holiday and then the other week, my manager said, "Do you want to keep the momentum going? You're on a bit of a roll here, and if you want to keep it going, I can suggest other people you might work with." So he sent me a few suggestions. I liked what I was hearing that Ryan was doing. I didn't know much about him. I phoned him up and we had a great conversation, so I said, "Well, come to my studio in England and we'll just figure it out. We'll just think of something." So I said, "I've got a couple of songs. We could do these." He said, "No, no. Let's just make it up." We didn't have long. We just had the seven days, it might have even been five days. So we just made them up and we ended up making up three tracks.

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On The Sgt. Peppers Documentary:

I wasn't really gonna watch this 'cuz, it's like I thought, "Well, I kinda know everything he's gonna tell me." Then he started in on "Penny Lane." It hooked me in 'cuz he started to say, "Oh, now Paul wants to go higher, but he actually modulates down a key." I'm going, "Did I? Oh, wow. That's good." I'm getting impressed by this young 24-year-old's work, you know. Now I'm intrigued, and he got to this bit where he sort of said, "And the `Penny Lane' piano." I thought, "Yeah, okay, I know. I played it. I know how that went." He said, "It's not just one piano." I'm sitting there going, "Yeah, it is. What do you mean, it's not just one?" He starts going back to the multitracks, and he goes, "Well, there's one piano." I said, "Yeah, that's it," and he goes, "and then they've got this little spiky piano," and then he plays, and there's this very trebly little "dink, dink, dink" piano playing along with it. Then he goes, "And then there's this harmonium," and it turned out I'd forgotten, but we'd put all these layers into this piano that eventually sounds like one very groovy piano, so much so that I believed it myself. Because of the rerelease of Sgt. Pepper. I was inspired by how experimental we were and the inspiration that we'd had for Sgt. Pepper, and I thought, "Yeah, that's a kind of good way to go, is to just not make the same old record." Just trying to think outside the box and think, you know, what can we do now that's crazy?

On John Lennon's Studio Bathroom Trick:

It keeps it really interesting. You go in each day, and instead of thinking, "Oh, I've gotta do this song, I hope I do it good," there'll be a bit of that, but mainly it'll be, "Well, if I don't do it good, we'll mess around." We'll get something that excites us. We'll put a crazy sound on it and I'll go, "Oh, yeah, I can sing to that," and it's often that. We did a lot of that in the Beatles. John was particularly fond of putting an echo when he was doing a vocal, so he would do what we called a bog echo. In Liverpool, "bog" means the toilet. You know, "I'm going to the bog," and the toilet traditionally has got a good acoustic, so we would call this little delay on the vocal sound the bog echo. It just gives you a little bit different feeling than when you're just hearing you're own voice, plain and straightforward. It's like you're Elvis.

On The Beatles Stereotypes:

This is the thing. What happens over time, things become legendary, so you'll get John was the dark one, Paul was the cute one, and that's not true, because we each had a bit of that or the other. George could be very much the one who'd bring that. When I'm talking about it, I always use that example of the song "Getting Better." I go, "It's getting better all the time," and John goes, "Couldn't get much worse," so you know, that's a good example of how we would do that. Often it could be George who'd do it just as much as John would, and I think I would sometimes take John's songs and darken them. I mean, "Come Together" was a very jolly little song when John brought it in, and it was like, "No, we're not gonna do that." We had those kind of influences on each other, but the story sticks that John was the dark one, I was the light one, George was the mystic one, you know. To some degree that's true, but we each had aspects of all those kind of forces, and Ringo too. He would come in, sort of put some drumming on it that, we'd be like, "Whoa." I had the song "Get Back," and I was just going (singing) and he comes up with (singing), and that drum beat makes that record. We were all four corners of a square, the Beatles. It was a very democratic group, so we all brought ideas in. Maybe John and I wrote most of the songs, but George wrote some of the best songs. :ike, "Something," some of those songs he wrote. Fantastic.

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On The White Album:

Because it was towards the end of the Beatles, all the forces that were later gonna break the Beatles up ... which is mainly business, to tell you the truth ... there was a lot of arguing about business, and we didn't like that. We'd always traditionally just left that to someone else, but it got a bit dangerous to do that, and that someone else ... who was a different someone else, actually ... was about to nick it all, so that got ...It was a guy called Allen Klein, yeah. It got dangerous. There was an idea that he was maybe going to take over, and take over all the money and all the stuff that we'd ever done, and that made it a difficult period. The great thing was when we got in the studio, it all changed, 'cuz we were just these four guys again and it wasn't to do with business. It was now to do with business, and so sometimes we did record separately. I would do "Blackbird," but only because it's a solo song. I did "Yesterday," and I said to them, "Okay, guys, what are you gonna do on this," and they all said, "Well, we can't. It's a solo song, you know." It wasn't 'cuz we were arguing. Some of the great songs like, "She's So Heavy," John's, I mean, we all got right in there. There was no ... we were at peace when we were playing music in the studio. It was always a thrill, from the word go when the Beatles were formed to the word stop. We always got in the studio, and even if we were arguing, that kind of got superseded by the music. We argued like families argue. In the early days it was always John and George arguing about who would have his amp the loudest. They'd agree, "Okay, look, now let's put it at seven," okay, and they put it at seven, and then we'd be playing and you'd just see George kind of back towards his amp and go, "Nine?" Then John'd notice, so he'd quietly sneak towards his amp, " Ten." Then now we've got, "Hey, what are you doing?" That might cause a bit of an argument, but other than that, when we played music, it came good.

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I have written for Billboard, Rolling Stone, the L.A. Times, Yahoo, Vice and every other major publication as well as host the Hulu interview series Riffing With and teach music journalism for Grammy Camp. I have had countless amazing experiences in music, from tea with Neil Young and hanging in a limo with Stevie Wonder to drinking beer bongs with the Foo Fighters in Vegas and being onstage with Skrillex. When not writing about music I am hanging with my dog, playing basketball and eating sushi in sunny Southern California.











lunes, 15 de octubre de 2018

Paul McCartney Can’t Stop Making People Happy


















 THE PAUL MCCARTNEY WORLD TOUR (1989-90)




www.theatlantic.com
Paul McCartney Can’t Stop Making People Happy
Now 76, with a new album, the pop legend continues to delight and comfort the world with his music.
JAMES PARKER
THE ATLANTIC
NOVEMBER 2018 ISSUE


CATHAL DUANE

Does everyone already know the story of Paul McCartney and the milkman? I think I only just heard it, although at the same time it feels like a story I was told long ago, magical-indelible, back in the wavy chambers of my childhood. It goes like this: Paul McCartney, vital young Beatle, is lying in bed one morning in 1963 when he hears the milkman making his rounds. The milk bottles are clinking and clanking, doorstep to doorstep, and the milkman is whistling, as milkmen will. And what he’s whistling is the Beatles’ new single, “From Me to You.” Da da da, da da dum dum da. The pop star sinks back into his pillow, into his morning-warm mattress, vibrating head to toe with a nice horizontal buzz of gratification. He knows he’s cracked the code.

Very McCartney, that story—trite, profound, and instantly folkloric. The sound of a milkman’s whistle is proverbially mindless, the mere absent tootling of a city yawning awake. Yet how meaningful it is: McCartney’s song, sent out into the world, is being returned to him, pearl-like, on a ripple of the working-class unconscious. In Penny Lane there is a milkman whistling Beatles songs …

Sir Paul McCartney is 76 years old, and currently on a world tour to promote his new album, Egypt Station. “He can’t stop working or he’ll die,” I was recently assured over email by a friend who is the most passionate McCartney fan I know. “Also he plays the piano like a percussion instrument.” There he is, an automaton of his own vast gifts, thumping away at the keys. The first song on Egypt Station is “I Don’t Know”: lovely, trudging, Beatle-doleful piano, and McCartney singing in a voice striated with age. I got crows at my window / Dogs at my door / I don’t think I can take any more. The song is a dialogue between this figure—this small, embattled Paul, besieged by omens—and the supernaturally consoling presence that appears before him in the chorus. It’s all right, sleep tight / I will take the strain / You’re fine / Love of mine / You will feel no pain. This is a presence that we recognize from “Let It Be,” although the suggestion of anesthesia is new. Is it Mother Mary, or is it Morpheus, easeful death?


© Getty

McCartney may have made more people happy—gapingly, tinglingly, mind-cancelingly happy—than any other artist, alive or dead. W. H. Auden wrote, In headaches and in worry / Vaguely life leaks away. Paul McCartney has been the opposite of that. The rush of early Beatles; the towering artistic magnanimity of middle-period Beatles; the epic fragmentations of late Beatles; and his solo songbook, which sometimes feels like a wild succession of one-hit wonders, of brilliant, bulbous, unrelated novelties—in every phase, in every style, he has insisted that we not allow our lives to leak away. His scope is immense. Think for a second about Revolver, and try to hold in your head the idea that the Larkin-esque elegist who wrote “Eleanor Rigby”—that rhapsody of glumness, that death-of-God song—is also the man playing bass on “And Your Bird Can Sing,” with a technique as restless and fiery-fingered as The Who’s John Entwistle’s but with an extra dimension of melodic bounteousness and buoyancy, of pure, generative tune-energy. (I just listened to it again, and burst out laughing.)

“Penny Lane” is the perfect summation, in a way: a trippily colorized vision of everyday life as a harmonic whole, a sublime congruity or comedy, a humming, sanctified circuit in which the brass-band trumpeter sounds like Bach and the fireman keeps a portrait of the Queen in his pocket. If you watched McCartney recently on James Corden’s “Carpool Karaoke,” doing a nostalgia tour of Liverpool with his host blushing and chirping at the wheel, you’ll have seen how people—young, old, of every shape and color—respond to him. He travels in a pocket universe of delight. You’ll also have seen him carefully adding his signature to the scuffed, graffitied street sign of the real Penny Lane: signing it like an artist signs his creation.





“Poetry reveals language’s underlying metrical and intonational regularity, and its tendency to pattern its sounds,” the Scottish poet and musician Don Paterson writes in his new book, The Poem. Poetry does that, and so does Paul McCartney. He can’t help himself. Swaying daisies sing a lazy song beneath the sun. That’s from 1968’s “Mother Nature’s Son,” perhaps the single most pristine utterance of McCartney’s muse in his whole corpus. The softly dulled guitar-chime, the foot-tap and the lulling rhyme, the sleepy delivery: Find me in my field of grass / Mother Nature’s son. This is not 20th-century music. It has nothing to do with sex, politics, the trapped self, or the long chore of consciousness. This is pre-modern, pre-adult, pre-gravity. It runs straight back to the first climates of the imagination, to the place where William Blake wrote his Songs of Innocence: Piping down the valleys wild / Piping songs of pleasant glee / On a cloud I saw a child.

And then, from the same era and acoustic realm, there’s “Blackbird,” shimmering in the predawn: Take these broken wings and learn to fly. For me this is McCartney self-soothing in the face of the Beatles’ meltdown, the impending bummer of individuation. It was from the White Album sessions, after all—everybody writing his own songs, grumpy, with Yoko Ono sitting harbingerlike in the studio, a carved, impassive face in a cavern of hair. So what’s a sad but incorrigibly optimistic bandleader to do, if not direct himself right into the dark, into the lustrousness, into the deep blackbird-feather gleam of promise? Blackbird, fly / Blackbird, fly / Into the light of the dark black night. (Limpid squirtings of actual blackbird-song conclude the track, the bird as compulsive a melodist as McCartney himself.)


© Getty

Biography supplies the platitudes: how the loss of his mother when he was 14, and the subsequent need to make the best of things, produced the hard shell of perkiness. Post-Beatles, freed or cut off from the drug-drag and the sourly twanging intellect of John Lennon, what happened to his talent? By one account, it accelerated into nonsense: form without content, songs about nothing but the fact that they were songs. But that’s not quite right. I was 9 when “Mull of Kintyre” came out, in 1977, and though I’m not from Scotland, I recognized it immediately as my birthright, a song of my blood, the only possible way to sing about this hitherto uncelebrated peninsula, Kintyre. Oh, the bagpipes. Oh, the drums! (In the U.S., interestingly, this song did nothing. In the U.K., at the top of the charts, it dueled titanically with two of the mightiest singles ever released: Queen’s “We Are the Champions” and Abba’s “The Name of the Game.”)

And what about the thundering emotional nudism of “Maybe I’m Amazed,” the least macho love song ever? Maybe I’m amazed at the way you love me all the time / Maybe I’m afraid of the way I love you. To be amazed and afraid—a biblical echo can be heard in there, from somewhere deep in McCartney’s Liverpool-Catholic wiring. Mark 10:32: “And Jesus went before them: and they were amazed; and as they followed, they were afraid.”




“Love you, Paul,” says a shaven-headed man on “Carpool Karaoke,” outside the pre-Beatles McCartney-family home on Forthlin Road. He says it with easy Liverpudlian warmth, but also with a degree of urgency. Because it’s important that McCartney knows this. Let us not be afraid of the way we love him. For more than 50 years he’s been making us happy, giving us comfort, a genius who scoops tunes out of the air with his hands. It’s the milkman’s whistle, it’s the music of the spheres. From him to us, and back again. Da da da, da da dum dum da.


This article appears in the November 2018 print edition with the headline “The Eternal Sunshine of Paul McCartney.”




sábado, 13 de octubre de 2018

ACL (Second Week) Live Review: Paul McCartney

















www.austinchronicle.com
ACL Live Review: Paul McCartney
Listen to what the man said
BY ALEJANDRA RAMIREZ
OCT. 13, 2018

The Beatles made pop music that normally shouldn’t work, and Paul McCartney knows it. After performing the billet-doux jangle of “From Me to You,” he recalled, “Someone asked me once, ‘What was the turning point for you and the band?’” As he cradled a Martin guitar and hummed the melody to the tune in its major key, the answer seemed to be the actual song.


Photo by Gary Miller

Yet in an unexpected clunk, he resolved to a tense G minor. Surprised, he stared at his guitar and joked, “G minor?! That’s a turning point, right?”

In conventional pop modus operandi, these songs with dissonant resolve are dangerous territory, but in modern pop vernacular, they’re timeless and brilliant, and changed the trajectory of rock & roll and pop. You can hear it on the jarring onset of “A Hard Day’s Night.” As the first song of the night, six strings rang with an unorthodoxy that clanged like a rattling iron church bell, bringing a large congregation to McCartney’s nearly three-hour Magical Mystery Tour at ACL Fest for a second consecutive Friday.

Next came the one-two punch of a spry “All My Loving” and Wings’ slinky panache on “Letting Go.” Both struck with an equal aplomb that was met by either a kick of his Chelsea boot or goofy gyrations. Even at 76, he’s still the cutest and most beloved Beatle.

Quick to take off his denim jacket and roll up his sleeves, McCartney swapped out his iconic violin Hofner bass for a multicolored Les Paul on Band on the Run’s “Let Me Roll It.” The hard-edged, swift lick sparked like tripwire to the explosive Jimi Hendrix tribute “Foxy Lady.” Dialing in torrential Sixties fuzz and coaxing feedback, the knighted Liverpudlian might have bested his trusted axemen, Rusty Anderson and Brian Ray.

In a 31-song set, the bandleader sucked the audience into a vertiginous time warp, traversing through a multitude of eras. The Seventies, “Maybe I’m Amazed” and “Nineteen Hundred and Eighty Five,” kept him perched alongside a grand piano, while Beatlemania from the previous decade metered out the early-show triumvirate of “We Can Work It Out,” “From Me To You,” and “Love Me Do.” The side-winked and cheeky “Fuh You” and “Come On to Me,” off his latest Egyptian Station, sneaked their way in for a leap of centuries.

While hi-hats muffled like carnival monkey cymbals on Sgt. Peppers’ “Being for the Benefit of Mr. Kite!,” George Harrison tribute “Something” dialed back with a ukulele arrangement in simplistic reverie. Karaoke and jukebox hour then commenced with calypso-tinged fluff “Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da” and piano ballad epic “Let It Be,” while “Back in the U.S.S.R” coalesced Beach Boys harmonies and Chuck Berry skewer-cooked riffage.

In the pyrotechnic-assisted “Live and Let Die,” brass crescendos and sweeping strings launched into the transcendental ether of closer “Hey Jude.” Beyond the crowd-pleasing and 60 years worth of celebrity, there’s some sage wisdom lined in Paul McCartney’s songwriting. In his own words, listen to what the man said.





www.kvue.com
'I've got a feeling in Texas' | Paul McCartney gives a history lesson in The Beatles at ACL Fest
It was Beatlemania all over again as Sir Paul McCartney closed out the show Friday night during Weekend 2 of the ACL Music Festival.
Author: Drew Knight
Published: October 12, 2018




AUSTIN — "I've got a feeling in Texas," was one of the first lines Sir Paul McCartney spoke to the thousands of fans who packed Zilker Park Friday night for the 2018 Austin City Limits Festival.

To just about any music fan, the sheer bragging rights of being able to say you've seen a founding member of The Beatles perform live was enough to dole out the big bucks for an ACL wristband. Which is why it came as no surprise that McCartney attracted a massive crowd to his performance during Weekend 2 -- despite having played the same stage only a week prior.

As they say, the Brit hopped the pond yet again for another historical moment on the ACL stage, performing songs of his own and those that brought The Beatles to international fame and hysteria.




As he sang what he called "old songs, new songs and some in-between songs," he gave the ACL crowd a little history lesson along the way.

The first came after he gave tribute to American guitar legend Jimi Hendrix with a riff from the Hendrix song "Foxy Lady." McCartney said he was very lucky to meet Hendrix in London in the 60s -- this was during the "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band" era. He said when Hendrix began wailing on his guitar, it fell out of tune. He knew fellow legend Eric Clapton was hiding in the crowd, so McCartney said Hendrix proceeded to ask him to tune it. He also mentioned Clapton was hiding because of that fact.

Speaking of instruments, McCartney also paid tribute to fellow Beatle George Harrison -- a star ukulele player. Before opening into a ukulele version of "Something," he took a moment to explain how the late Harrison was a uke expert. In fact, he said the very ukulele he was playing was a gift from Harrison himself.




Later on in the show, he recalled one of The Beatles' earliest moments in recording at Abbey Road. That song was "Love Me Do." He explained that when asked to sing the words "Love Me Do" along with the harmonica, he got nervous.

"I can still hear the tremor in my voice," McCartney said before jumping into the song. "But not tonight."

Soon after, he gave an important lesson on one of the biggest Beatles hits, "Blackbird." McCartney remembered writing it during the Civil Rights era with the hopes of giving people in southern cities like Little Rock, Arkansas -- home of the historical "Little Rock Crisis'' -- hope to keep pressing forward.





Another history lesson came after the performance of "Back in the U.S.S.R." He recalled performing in the actual U.S.S.R, now Russia. Top leaders with the Kremlin were backstage hoping to speak with the band. One of those officials told him he learned English listening to The Beatles.

"He looked me right in the eye and said, 'Hello, Gooodbye,'" McCartney laughed.

Another important history lesson seemed to be learned by McCartney himself.

After a photo of McCartney waving around a Chilean flag during his performance at Weekend 1 of the festival, it seems the rock legend, or a member of his crew, corrected the mistake. When the crowd gave him an encore, Sir McCartney came running out with the remarkably similar -- and correct -- Texas flag.





We'll forgive you, Paul.


Image result for paul mccartney acl



viernes, 12 de octubre de 2018

FRESHEN UP IN AUSTIN CITY LIMITS - WEEKEND 2 : October 12 2018 - Zilker Park, 2100 Barton Springs Rd, Austin, USA





















OCT
12
2018

Austin City Limits - Weekend 2

Zilker Park,
2100 Barton Springs Rd,
Austin,
TX 78704,
USA


























Una publicación compartida de Purr Cilla (@purr__cilla) el




twitter.com/ParkerTodd16

This Paul McCartney guy has lots of potential! I think he can really be a star one day! Very nice of Brockhampton to open for him!






www.instagram.com/brittnybeauchamp/

Paul McCartney at Austin City Limits Music Festival last Friday night ✨









www.instagram.com/hhhsaytoe


Oh, hi Paul.



twitter.com/KVUE

Paul McCartney takes the stage at ACL Festival weekend 2 🤟🎸🎶 (📷: John Gusky/KVUE News)












twitter.com/friendofyours__


Close your eyes and I’ll kiss you... #ACLFest @PaulMcCartney 





www.instagram.com/zerowasteolga


Nothing much to say except experiences over things, amirite? 💛 #paulmccartney #aclfest





www.instagram.com/adi7anand

#paulmccartney | #aclfest weekend two day one








www.instagram.com/saltwatersanctuary


Sir Paul McCartney! 
#paulmccartney #aclfest #austincitylimits












twitter.com/Matt_Burton22

About 500 yards away (closest we could get) from Sir Paul McCartney. @PaulMcCartney thank you. 





twitter.com/JMichaelYoung1

Paul Mccartney put on a great show at #ACLFest