viernes, 20 de enero de 2017

'A Day in the Life': 10 Things You Didn't Know

www.rollingstone.com
Beatles' 'A Day in the Life': 10 Things You Didn't Know
Read 10 little-known facts about "A Day in the Life," considered by many to be the Beatles' single greatest recorded achievement
By Colin Fleming
Jan 19 2017



"'A Day in the Life' – that was something," John Lennon told Rolling Stone in 1968, setting up a classic bit of understatement. "I dug it. It was a good piece of work between Paul and me." The Beatles' catalog brims with legendary tracks, but the epic Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band finale has long towered above the rest, a fact made official in 2011 when Rolling Stone named it as the group's single finest song. Studio recordings for "A Day in the Life" commenced 50 years ago, on January 19th, 1967. Here we look at 10 things you might not have known about the Fab Four's most glorious achievement.

1. The death of a friend of the band inspired the pivotal line about the man who "blew his mind out in a car."
A core inspiration for the song – specifically John Lennon's opening sequence, about a man who "blew his mind out in a car" – pertained to the death of Tara Browne, who had died in a car accident on December 18th, 1966. The 21-year-old Browne was the heir to the Guinness fortune and a friend of the Beatles'. The January 17th edition of The Daily Mail – which is to say, the edition two days before recording sessions started for "A Day in the Life" – featured an article about Browne's two children and the custody case pertaining to them. Lennon, who regularly turned to the papers for inspiration, worked this habit for the song's famous opening line, "I read the news today, oh, boy," combining English tragedy with a Buddy Holly verbal tic. "Tara didn't blow his mind out," Lennon said, "but it was in my mind when I was writing that verse. The details of the accident of the song – not noticing traffic lights and a crowd forming at the scene – were similarly part of the fiction." The idea of spectating is crucial to "A Day in the Life," and it is this opening vignette that establishes the theme of peering into new worlds. (Browne also helped Paul McCartney have his first LSD experience.)

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2. "A Day in the Life" was the first song recorded for what was intended as a concept album about childhood in Liverpool.
Following the sessions for "Strawberry Fields Forever" and "Penny Lane" – which found Lennon and McCartney, respectively, looking back to their Liverpool childhoods – the band gave some thought to doing an album that fleshed out those themes of growing up in what had become England's most famous port city. The Beatles were in a childhood frame of mind. This fact, in part, accounts for McCartney's middle section of "A Day in the Life," about waking up, being late and riding a bus. (George Harrison had auditioned for Lennon and McCartney by playing "Raunchy" on a bus, and as McCartney mentioned on a BBC session in support of Beatles for Sale in 1964, "I like riding on a bus.") By the first recording session for the song, then titled "In the Life Of," the childhood concept album had been ditched in favor of something more grown-up. "We really hated that fucking four little mop-top approach," McCartney said. "We were not boys, we were men." Still, like much of Sgt. Pepper, the song retains a certain childlike wonder.


Lennon with George Martin at Abbey Road Frank Hermann/Redux

3. Roadie Mal Evans "played" the alarm clock heard on the song.
"When we took it to the studio I suggested 'Let's put aside 24 bars and just have Mal count them,'" McCartney remembered. When the recording for the song began, the Beatles did not know that they would fill those bars with the song's dramatic orchestral crescendos, just that they'd have to fill them with something. "It was just a period of time, an arbitrary length of bars, which was very Cage thinking," McCartney continued. But not so arbitrary – the song is a "A Day in the Life," after all, and there are 24 bars – same amount of hours in a day. "We got Mal Evans to count each bar," George Martin said, "and on the record you can still hear his voice as he stood by the piano counting: 'One-two-three-four…' For a joke, Mal set an alarm clock to go off at the end of 24 bars, and you can hear that too. We left it on because we couldn't get it off!" The joke of an alarm clock became a brilliant use of aleatoric sound, triggering McCartney's "woke up, got out of bed" section perfectly.

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4. The song's third verse features a nod to John Lennon's side gig as an actor.
Having acted in Richard Lester's How I Won the War in September of the previous year – he started writing "Strawberry Fields Forever" while on location – Lennon penned the lines, "I saw a film today, oh, boy/The English army had just won the war." Vital Beatles assistant Neil Aspinall accompanied Lennon to Spain, so that the Beatle would have someone to talk to when not filming. It was while working on the film that Lennon came by the famous granny glasses that would prove so central to Sgt. Pepper–era iconography.

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Paul McCartney conducting a 40-piece orchestra during the recording of A Day in the Life

5. The Daily Mail and a friend of Lennon's helped the band come up with a famous line.
It makes pleasing sense now, but at the time, the Beatles probably weren't aware just how much a song about day-in, day-out existence dovetailed so seamlessly with their use of the daily newspaper. A January 7th report in The Daily Mail talked about potholes in Blackburn, Lancashire that needed to be filled. "We looked through the newspaper and both wrote the verse 'how many holes in Blackburn, Lancashire,'" McCartney said. "I liked the way he said, 'Lan-ca-sheer,' which is the way you'd pronounce it up north." According to Lennon, "There was still one word in that verse when we came to record. I knew the line had to go: 'Now they know how many holes it takes to – something – the Albert Hall.' It was nonsense verse, really, but for some reason I couldn't think of the verb. What did the holes do to the Albert Hall? It was Terry [Doran; Lennon's friend and later the managing director of Apple] who said 'fill' the Albert Hall. And that was it."

6. The first take of the song featured one of Lennon's characteristically offbeat count-ins.
John Lennon was always game for some surreal studio banter. His count-in for 1965 B side "Yes It Is" went "One, two, three, bread!" In the case of "A Day in the Life," he went with the Tchaikovsky nod "sugar plum fairy, sugar plum fairy," as can be heard on the portion of the first take featured on the first Anthology album. There is a Lewis Carroll–like mystery to the words, which served Lennon's purposes well: If ever a confection could be used to count in a song and set a mood for a band, this would be that one time.




7. The BBC banned "A Day in the Life" because of its central line: "I'd love to turn you on."
"This was the time of Tim Leary's 'Turn on, tune in, drop out,'" McCartney recalled, "and we wrote 'I'd love to turn you on.' John and I gave each other a knowing look: 'Uh-huh, it's a drug song. You know that, don't you?' Yes, but at the same time, our stuff is always very ambiguous and 'turn you on' can be sexual so ... c'mon!" The BBC didn't appreciate the wordplay. "We have listened to this song over and over again," a spokesman said in 1967. "And we have decided that it appears to go just a little too far, and could encourage a permissive attitude to drug-taking." Lennon was predictably salty, post-banning: "I'd like to meet the man who banned this song of ours. I'd like to turn him on to what's happening. Why don't they charge the Electricity Board with spreading drugs because to get electricity you have to 'switch on'? Everything depends on the way you read a thing."

8. The group didn't have an easy time conveying their ideas to the orchestra that played on the song.
After coming up with the "I'd love to turn you on" line, McCartney recounted that "As John and I looked at each other, a little flash went between our eyes, like 'I'd love to turn you on,' a recognition of what we were doing, so I thought, OK, we've got to have something amazing that will illustrate that." McCartney's first thought was for a 90-piece orchestra, but this became a 40-piece unit that recorded their part – a glissando to sound like the end of a Wagnerian world – on February 10th. The classical musicians were given costume pieces – and plastic nipples – to don, thus lightening the mood, as Brian Jones, Keith Richards, Donovan, Mick Jagger, Marianne Faithful and others cavorted at the session. George Martin had some problems with the assembled musicians. "A well-schooled orchestra plays, ideally, like one man, following the leader," he said. "I emphasized that this was exactly what they must not do." Martin and McCartney wanted each musician to begin as quietly as possible and end at what was tantamount to a musical orgasm – while not listening at all to the players sitting next to them. "The orchestra, of course, thought it was all a stupid giggle and a waste of money."

he BEATLES, an English rock band, one of the most popular bands in history. PICTURED: The band in a good mood at a reception right after one of their songs was banned by the B.B.O. because they feared it might encourage drug taking. The song, 'A Day in this Life', had already been banned by some U.S. broadcasting stations.
ZUMAPress

9. The band recorded the song almost exclusively at night.
"A Day in the Life" was the song that established the Beatles as the nocturnal denizens of Abbey Road. Despite studio time being expensive, the Beatles, after their matchless run to date, could pretty much pick when they wanted to work. And how long they'd take in working. Assembling in Studio 2 at 7:30 p.m. on January 19th, they toiled until 2:30 in the morning. Similarly, the next day's session went into the wee hours, setting up a trend that would continue throughout the recording of the album. Lennon rarely awoke before noon, so the Abbey Road staff was forced to adjust. In all, 34 Beatle hours went into "A Day in the Life," compared with the 585 minutes required for the whole of Please Please Me. One tricky bit was Lennon's vocals, which required a number of attempts, in part because, according to engineer Geoff Emerick, "John was hearing that echo in his cans as he was singing. It wasn't put on after. He used his own echo as a rhythmic feel."

10. The song's final chord took three men to play.
The Beatles were masters at the iconic chord – consider the opening of "A Hard Day's Night" – but there may be none to match the final chord of "A Day in the Life." It was achieved at a special overdub session on February 22nd, at which Mal Evans made his second recorded contribution to the Beatles canon, as he, John and Ringo Starr sat at three pianos, simultaneously striking E major. This took nine takes to get right, because the players had a hard time hitting the note at the exact same moment. The last take was dubbed best, and then overdubbed thrice, so the effect is that of nine pianos played by 12 men. Engineer Geoff Emerick kept lifting the volume faders, and it is possible to hear the studio's heating system on the finished recording. Aptly, considering the track's now-mythic status, the sound simply goes on, and on, and on, with seemingly endless sustain.



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jueves, 19 de enero de 2017

Paul McCartney sues Sony over Beatles songs

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www.bbc.com
Sir Paul McCartney sues Sony over Beatles songs
BBC News
19 Jan 2017

Sir Paul McCartney
Sony said it was "disappointed" by Sir Paul McCartney's lawsuit

It could become one of the most important legal battles in music - Sir Paul McCartney is suing Sony over control of The Beatles' back catalogue.
The star has gone to a US court, seeking to regain the publishing rights to 267 of the band's classic songs.
He's been trying to get them back since the 1980s, when Michael Jackson famously out-bid him for the rights.
Jackson's debt-ridden estate sold the songs to Sony last year, along with others including New York, New York.
Sir Paul's legal case, filed in a Manhattan court on Wednesday, is over what is known as copyright termination - the right of authors to reclaim ownership of their works from music publishers after a specific length of time has passed.
It was part of the US 1976 Copyright Act and, in recent years, performers like Prince, Billy Joel and Blondie have used it to regain control of their work.
However, Duran Duran recently lost a similar case - when the British High Court ruled that the contracts they signed in the UK took precedence over their rights in the US.

The Beatles and Brian Epstein
The Beatles signed away their publishing rights at the start of their career, on the advice of manager Brian Epstein (right)

Under UK law, music publishing companies can control the copyright until 70 years after the artist's death.
Sir Paul is worried that Sony/ATV Music Publishing will use Duran Duran's loss to challenge his attempts to obtain The Beatles' back catalogue.
With his legal action, Sir Paul is trying to ensure Sony does not stand in his way by accusing him of a breach of contract or publishing agreement.
"Rather than provide clear assurances to Paul McCartney that defendants will not challenge his exercise of his termination rights, defendants are clearly reserving their rights pending the final outcome of the Duran Duran litigation," said the legal papers filed on his behalf.
The papers state that Sir Paul wants "quiet, unclouded title to his rights". Sony/ATV said it was "disappointed" by the lawsuit, calling it "both unnecessary and premature".
Unlike Duran Duran, Sir Paul has filed his legal case in America, and the verdict could have major ramifications for other British artists.
'Highest respect'
Songs in the Lennon-McCartney catalogue, composed between September 1962 and June 1971, become eligible for copyright termination in the US after 56 years.
The first will be Love Me Do, which could revert to Sir Paul in 2018 - but others, including Come Together and Get Back, are not due to become available until 2025.
The star started sending notices to Sony/ATV in 2008, stating his desire to reclaim the copyright, the legal papers said.
His lawyers have repeatedly asked Sony/ATV to acknowledge his rights to terminate copyright - but the company has declined to do so, it continued.
He is seeking a declaration from the court that he can reclaim his songs, as well as legal fees.
In a statement, the music publisher said it had "the highest respect for Sir Paul McCartney with whom we have enjoyed a long and mutually rewarding relationship with respect to the treasured Lennon and McCartney song catalogue".
It added: "We have collaborated closely with both Sir Paul and the late John Lennon's Estate for decades to protect, preserve and promote the catalogue's long-term value."
Lennon's share in The Beatles' songs will not return to his estate because Yoko Ono sold the rights to his music to Sony/ATV Music in 2009, with those rights lasting the entire copyright's lifetime (70 years).





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miércoles, 18 de enero de 2017

Stunning photos reveal the rock and roll past of Beatles hangout the Cavern Club

www.thesun.co.uk
BEAT THAT Stunning photos reveal the rock and roll past of Beatles hangout the Cavern Club, which opened 60 years ago today
Throughout the swinging sixties the club was a mecca for rock fans, frequently hosting the Beatles in the band's early years
BY GEORGE HARRISON
15th January 2017

THE Cavern Club, the legendary venue famed for hosting the Beatles in their early days, first opened its doors to the public 60 years ago today.

After opening as a jazz venue on 16 January 1957,  it didn’t take long before the Cavern Club had established itself as the centre of Liverpool’s rock and roll scene.

The club regularly hosted the Beatles in the band’s early days
The club regularly hosted the Beatles in the band’s early days

After opening as a jazz venue in 1957, the club eventually made a name for itself as a rock and roll hub
After opening as a jazz venue in 1957, the club eventually made a name for itself as a rock and roll hub

Revellers danced their way through the sixties at the iconic club, which opened 60 years ago today
Revellers danced their way through the sixties at the iconic club, which opened 60 years ago today

Throughout the swinging sixties the club was a mecca for rock fans, frequently hosting the Beatles in the band’s early years.

The legendary band made nearly 300 appearances at the club between 1961 and 1963, with some of the Beatles’ sets at the Cavern Club snapped on camera.

Photos from the club’s past show revellers dancing away to Britain’s most famous boy band, years before Beatlemania went global.

A loved-up couple share a kiss on the packed dance floor
A loved-up couple share a kiss on the packed dance floor

Serving as the centre of Liverpool’s rock and roll scene, the club was a mecca for fans of the genre
Serving as the centre of Liverpool’s rock and roll scene, the club was a mecca for fans of the genre

Music lovers swarmed to the club to see acts such as the Rolling Stones and Queen
Music lovers swarmed to the club to see acts such as the Rolling Stones and Queen

And on the venue’s 60th anniversary, a series of stunning photos reveal how wild nights at the Cavern really were.

One incredible shot shows a loved up young couple enjoying the moment as they dance their way through the night.

Other photos show huge queues of excited customers waiting to get into the legendary venue, whilst one incredible snap features the Beatles midway through an early performance.

The club hosted the Beatles for the first time in 1961, before Beatlemania had really taken off
The club hosted the Beatles for the first time in 1961, before Beatlemania had really taken off

This shot, captured in 1963, shows Britain’s most famous boy band in their early days
This shot, captured in 1963, shows Britain’s most famous boy band in their early days

The club was set in a cellar below a fruit warehouse, creating a distinctive look and feel
The club was set in a cellar below a fruit warehouse, creating a distinctive look and feel

Found in a cellar beneath the ground, the venue was one of Britain’s most distinctive clubs, and remains a must-see attraction.

In its day, acts as famous and as varied as Queen, The Rolling Stones, The Kinks, Elton John and The Who graced the aptly-named Cavern Club’s stage.

Despite the original Cavern Club closing in 1973, the venue was rebuilt and reopened just over a decade later, and still bears the club’s famous name.

And the club’s legacy certainly endures today, since many credit the roaring success of venues such as the Cavern Club with attracting big-name record producers to the north – and away from their traditional London stomping grounds.

Punters would queue down the stairs for a chance to make it in to the trendy venue
Punters would queue down the stairs for a chance to make it in to the trendy venue

This incredible shot shows merry revellers lining the streets above the lively club
This incredible shot shows merry revellers lining the streets above the lively club

The club is credited with attracting big-name producers to the north of England
The club is credited with attracting big-name producers to the north of England




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martes, 17 de enero de 2017

The day John Lennon met Paul McCartney - by John's childhood friend

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THE DAY THAT CHANGED MUSIC: JOHN LENNON MEETS PAUL McCARTNEY, JULY6, 1957 (beatlely)



www.liverpoolecho.co.uk
The day John Lennon met Paul McCartney - by John's childhood friend
The Quarrymen's Rod Davis remembers Woolton Church fete 60 years on
BYCATHERINE JONES
17 JAN 2017




The Cavern isn’t the only 60th anniversary taking place in Liverpool this year.

On July 6, it will be 60 years to the day that John Lennon was introduced to Paul McCartney at the Woolton church fete.

The 16-year-old Lennon was playing at the summer event with his group The Quarrymen, a line-up of school friends from the near by Quarry Bank High School.

On banjo was Rod Davis, whose dad took one of the few images of that day – that of the Quarrymen’s float, with Lennon and the rest of the group on board.


John Lennon and the Quarrymen in Woolton during St Peter's Church fete in 1957 (Photo: James Davis)

Rod returned to the city this week to play with fellow Quarrymen at the Cavern’s 60th birthday celebrations.

And he took the time to look back seven decades to the group’s teenage years, and the day that would go down in 20th century music history.



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lunes, 16 de enero de 2017

The Beatles’ tech guru ‘Magic Alex’ dies

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John Lennon, Magic Alex (Alexis Mardas) and Mal Evans, 1968


www.nme.com
The Beatles’ tech guru ‘Magic Alex’ dies
Luke Morgan Britton
Jan 16, 2017

Yannis Alexis Mardas passed away in Athens at 74


The Beatles associate and “tech guru” ‘Magic Alex’ has passed away at the age of 74.

Yannis Alexis Mardas, known by the nicknames ‘Magic Alex’ and ‘John’, was one of the first Apple Corps employees after becoming friends with John Lennon. Mardas’ blinking light invention, dubbed the ‘Nothing Box’, is said to have stimulated Lennon’s LSD trips.

Mardas has been acknowledged as as a co-writer on Beatles outtake ‘What’s the New Mary Jane’. He also made an appearance in the band’s Magical Mystery Tour film (scroll below to watch).

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Mardas accompanied The Beatles on their 1968 visit to India and was the person to break the news of Lennon’s divorce plans to then-wife Cynthia Lennon.

In 1968, Mardas was in charge of building The Beatles a new recording studio but soon parted ways with Apple Corps.



Late in life, Mardas sued the New York Times for defamation after the newspaper called him a “charlatan”. He said in a statement: “I invented a large number of electronic devices, none of which had anything to do with music of the business of the Beatles. It must be remembered that none of these had even been thought about by others at the time, although most of them are now in common use”.

CNN Greece reports that Mardas died of natural causes in his Athens apartment.

See a video featuring Mardas’ electronic inventions below:





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domingo, 15 de enero de 2017

Ghosts surrounding the last two Beatles Ringo Starr and Paul McCartney

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The Beatles (left to right) John, George, Paul, Ringo


www.nzherald.co.nz
Band on the run: Ghosts surrounding the last two Beatles Ringo Starr and Paul McCartney
Steve Braunias
Saturday Jan 14, 2017

Death claimed an alarming number of much-loved rock stars in 2016. What's in store for 2017?

Group shot of beatles: (L-R) Ringo Starr, George Harrison, Paul McCartney, John Lennon. Photo / Redferns
Group shot of beatles: (L-R) Ringo Starr, George Harrison, Paul McCartney, John Lennon. Photo / Redferns

Okay so to be frank the question to ask after the year-long spate of rock star deaths is: Jesus, who's next?

In a New Yorker cartoon at the end of 2016, God says to the Grim Reaper, "Maybe go easy on the much-loved celebrities for a while." This time last year was the pretty shocking death of David Bowie, and at Christmas there was the really sad death of George Michael. In between, there was...just about everyone.

Bring out your listicles of the famous dead. 2016 saw what appeared to be record numbers of music royalty passing over to that great backstage in the sky. Prince. Leonard Cohen. Glenn Frey from The Eagles, Paul Kantner from Jefferson Airplane.

In New Zealand, Ray Columbus, Bunny Walters, and Toni Williams. Pete Burns from Dead or Alive, Alan Vega from Suicide. Elvis's guitar player Scotty Moore.

Bernie Worrell from Parliament, Maurice White from Earth Wind & Fire.

And more besides, plus 64 members of the Red Army Choir in a plane crash on Christmas Day.

Piece by piece, the original scaffolding of rock'n'roll is being taken away. The greatest art form of the 20th century was invented by the very young, but that was 50, 60 years ago, and the only ones left are now very old. The Stones. Dylan. Little Richard is 84! And right at top of rock's summit are two guys aged 74 and 76. Two guys who did more than anyone - alongside two other guys, now dead - to get the whole thing started; who made the songs that the world will likely never stop singing.

It's really not a good idea to imagine anyone dead but the fact is that life is going to feel decidedly strange and profoundly emptier when Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr die. No more Beatles. No more signs of life from the band who were bigger, as John Lennon mentioned in passing, than Jesus. No more Beatle Paul and Beatle Ringo, who did all those Beatle things that are now part of cultural history - the Cavern, The Ed Sullivan Show, Beatlemania, A Hard Day's Night, Sgt Pepper, walking in single file on the pedestrian crossing on Abbey Road.

One by one, the Fab Four are subtracting. No more Beatle John - killed at the hands of a maniac in 1980; no more Beatle George - dead from cancer in 2001. The remaining Fab Two appear to be industrious and content, all their faculties intact. Ringo routinely and robotically tweets messages of peace and love on his Twitter account, and McCartney is always up to something - his January appointments have included attending President Obama's farewell at the White House, and performing Helter Skelter at a live concert with The Killers.

Ringo Starr and Paul McCartney. Photo / AP
Ringo Starr and Paul McCartney. Photo / AP

All things must pass. When Paul and Ringo die, something inside millions of people will die. It's going to feel like the end of something - yeah, an era, but eras are always ending. There's something more intimate going on with the Beatles. Maybe it's because they're just so genuinely loveable. Every death is someone's loss and a Beatle death will be pretty much everyone's loss.

It won't be too flash for Paul and Ringo, either. That's the problem with being a living legend: we get to enjoy the legend, but the star has to put up with the living, and the various assorted complaints and anxieties of old age. 
Neither are getting any younger. Both might be around for another 20 years. Already they're surrounded by ghosts: John and George, for a start, but many others who were close to the band have died over the years.

Beatle history is a now a kind of graveyard. A tour of the cemetery brings back the past, tells the greatest story ever told one more time.

Stuart Sutcliffe, the original Fifth Beatle.
Stuart Sutcliffe, the original Fifth Beatle.

Stuart Sutcliffe (died 1962): The original Fifth Beatle. As a bass player he was a really good painter; his incompetence was one of the best things that ever happened to the Beatles, because it meant he was replaced by McCartney, who might be the greatest bass player in rock history. His death of a brain haemorrhage possibly dates back to a vicious beating. One version is that it was Lennon who kicked him in the head, leaving him for dead on the pavement. But that version is just one of those exciting and highly improbable yarns in Albert Goldman's crazy biography of Lennon. Sutcliffe was 21.

Brian Epstein (died 1967): The Beatles second manager. He squandered millions in bad deals and lost opportunities. but he dressed them in suits, got them a record contract, and put them in front of the world. He died of an accidental drug overdose in his sleep in the same weekend the Beatles took the train to learn about meditation from Indian holy man Maharishi Mahesh Yogi. A closet gay, lonely, he died of an accidental overdose aged 32.

Mal Evans (died 1976): The Beatles errand boy. In his 1968 biography The Beatles, author Hunter Davies observes Evans showing up at the recording studio during Sgt Pepper: "Mal appeared carrying a big brown paper bag full of socks, all in bright colours. He passed the bag to John first. John grabbed it in great delight. He chose several pairs of orange terry-towelling socks then passed the bag around for the others to have a dip." Evans was killed in a shoot-out with police at his home in Los Angeles. He was 40.

Ivan Vaughan (died 1993): He was this guy who had these two friends, one of them called John, who was in a skiffle group in Liverpool. They were playing at a village fete on July 6, 1957, and Vaughan brought along his other friend, Paul, who he introduced to John ..."I remember this beery old man breathing down me neck," McCartney later said. "It was John. He was 16 and I was 14, so he was a big man. I showed him a few chords. I felt I'd made an impression." Lennon remembered, "That was the day, the day I met Paul, that it started moving." Vaughan was diagnosed with Parkinson's disease in 1977 and died aged 51.

Derek Taylor (died 1997): The Beatles' press officer, who got the job after ghosting Epstein's biography, A Cellarful of Noise. Lennon said it should have been called A Cellarful of Boys. George Harrison and Jools Holland attended Taylor's funeral. He died of cancer aged 65.

Alf Bicknell (died 2004): The Beatles' chauffeur. In England, he drove them around in an Austin Princess, then one of only two cars in London to have blacked-out windows, and Lennon's Royce-Royce Phantom V. He was also in attendance when the band met Dylan at the Mayfair Hotel in New York, and Elvis at Bel-Air. Elvis said to him, "You are welcome to my home, sir." Bicknell died aged 75.

Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, Hindu spiritual leader. Photo / AP
Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, Hindu spiritual leader. Photo / AP

Maharishi Mahesh Yogi (died 2008): "You made a fool of everyone," Lennon sang about him on the White Album. It marked a bitter end to what had actually been a pretty blissed-out, six-week transcendental meditation programme at his ashram in India in 1968. The Beatles heard gossip that the Maharishi had tried to molest Mia Farrow, who was also at the ashram. Lennon told Rolling Stone editor Jann Wenner in the amazing book Lennon Remembers, "So we went to see Maharishi, the whole gang of us charged down to his hut, his very rich-looking bungalow in the mountains. I said, 'We're leaving.' He said, 'Why?' I said, 'Well, if you're so cosmic, you'll know why.' And he gave me such a look, like, 'I'll kill you, you bastard.' And I knew I had called his bluff." But the rumours about Farrow were false. Asked if he forgave the Beatles, the Maharishi said, "I could never be upset with angels." He died aged 90.

Allen Klein (died 2009): The Beatles' third manager, mostly famous for the brilliant Christmas card he wrote and sent out to friends and associates: "Yea though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil, because I'm the biggest bastard in the valley." Klein died of respiratory failure. aged 77.

Keyboardist Billy Preston. Photo / AP
Keyboardist Billy Preston. Photo / AP

Billy Preston (died 2006):The last Fifth Beatle. He was at the rooftop concert in 1969, playing keyboards on Get Back in their last live appearance. George Harrison brought the likeable Preston into the band to ease the tension. But Preston's own life was a mess. He was sexually abused as a child. His tormented self-denial that he was gay led to his arrest in 1991 for sexually assaulting a 16-year-old Mexican boy, after picking him up at a gathering point for day labourers. He was treated for cocaine addiction and alcoholism. Preston died in a drug rehab clinic, aged 59.

George Martin, producer of The Beatles, relaxes at his West Country home Friday June 14, 1996. Photo / AP
George Martin, producer of The Beatles, relaxes at his West Country home Friday June 14, 1996. Photo / AP

George Martin (died 2016): The Beatles' producer was among the rollcall of musical greats who died in 2016. "I want my voice to sound like a thousand monks chanting from a mountaintop," Lennon said to him, when the Beatles arrived in the studio to record Tomorrow Never Knows. Martin duly went to work. He died in his sleep, aged 90.

Allan Williams, helped the Beatles get early gigs, has died. He was 86. Photo / AP
Allan Williams, helped the Beatles get early gigs, has died. He was 86. Photo / AP

Allan Williams (died December 30, 2016): Just as the year was about to finish, there was one last rock farewell. Williams, who died aged 86, was the Beatles' first manager. He got them gigs in stripclubs and coffee bars in Liverpool, then sent them to their finishing school in rock'n'roll - Hamburg. The legend really begins there. Unfortunately for Williams, that's where it ended: the band got rid of him, then they got famous. The rest is history and death.

- NZ Herald

sábado, 14 de enero de 2017

New Paul McCartney album anticipated in 2017

Image result for paul mccartney with lp in his hand



www.beatlesnews.com
New Paul McCartney album anticipated in 2017 
Posted by Adam Forrest
Friday, 01/13/2017

Paul McCartney

In an article entitled "63 Most Anticipated Albums of 2017", Rolling Stone writes:

After announcing his return to Capitol Records, for whom the Beatles famously recorded, 74-year-old Paul McCartney wrapped up his 2016 tour and began work on his first album since 2013's New, going into the studio with producer Greg Kurstin, known for his work with Adele.

McCartney has also recorded tracks, including at least one with Lady Gaga, for an unnamed animation project.

"I'll put out my next album, but I won't think I'm gonna sell a lot," he told Rolling Stone last year. "I'm putting it out because I have songs that I like. And I will do my best job. The scene has changed, but it doesn't disturb me, because I had the best of it."


Image result for paul mccartney recording 2016