martes, 28 de marzo de 2017

Why it's not yet time to say Goodnight Tonight to Paul McCartney

Image result for paul mccartney goodnight 2017


www.smh.com.au
Why it's not yet time to say Goodnight Tonight to Paul McCartney
The 74-year-old former Beatle just announced he's set to release a new album with Adele producer Greg Kurstin. Let the ridicule begin.
Bernard Zuel
MARCH 28 2017

Of course it invited ridicule when Paul McCartney revealed he is working on a new album, with high level pop producer Greg "yep, that's me behind Adele's 25" Kurstin, no less.

Not because it's likely to be embarrassingly bad or because a retirement-age musician making music is unusual, or because the thought of the former Beatle pulling the Adele power ballad out makes no sense.


It's not even because for a few years the 74-year-old McCartney sported one of those late-in-life hair colour changes – one of those shades of red favoured by other second and third marriage types like Rupert Murdoch – that are like a "hit me now" sign.

Actually, it is a little because of that: everyone's father or grandfather has gone there, but that doesn't make it right and certainly doesn't make it any less side-splittingly funny.

Still kicking and writing and recording. Paul McCartney
Still kicking and writing and recording. Paul McCartney Photo: AP

Mostly though it's because McCartney has been mocked for so long that it is almost the default setting.

He was the cheery, thumbs-in-the-air rocker, the Mawkish R Us lyricist, the one who carried his own stash into Japan and got jailed, the one who wasn't sharp and bitter John, sweet and dry George or mellow yellow Ringo.

And of course he was the one who wrote songs that grew on you like lichen and had about as much appeal as cold moss after a while.

There was Obla-di Obla-da, Wonderful Christmas Time and the interminable Mull Of Kintyre, which seemingly lasts longer than it takes to walk to that corner of Scotland, and hurts twice as much.

Producer Greg Kurstin won three Grammys this year for his work with Adele, including Album of the Year for 25 and Song ...
Producer Greg Kurstin won three Grammys this year for his work with Adele, including Album of the Year for 25 and Song of the Year for Hello.  Photo: Tonya Wise

There was the irritating Beatle-goes-techno Temporary Secretary, the muddle-headed Say Say Say and The Girl Is Mine, with friend-turned-bete noir Michael Jackson, and finally the truly execrable, unforgivable, abomination before any musical god, Ebony And Ivory, with the equally culpable Stevie Wonder.

But as with Wonder, who has written some of the best music to ever grace a record player, McCartney can lay claim to some of the greatest pieces of pop penned yet. And some of the boldest adventures, too.

To list the gems here would take as long as it does to walk to every mull on or near bleedin' Kintyre but they run from I Saw Her Standing There and She's Leaving Home to Goodnight Tonight and Band On The Run, from Maybe I'm Amazed and Jet to Helter Skelter and (co-written with Elvis Costello) Veronica.




And despite a decade or so of often dull, sometimes sad and occasionally awful albums through the 1980s and 1990s, McCartney's post-Beatles output has in recent times been given a more sober and appreciative evaluation. That can be partly put down to reissues of early efforts such as the self-titled solo debut and, soon, 1989's Flowers In The Dirt; several well sourced, considered biographies; and the continuing revelations of his work funding music and education centres in home town Liverpool.

Even into his 70s McCartney had been taking risks as he did when he brought backward tapes and musique concrete to the Beatles in the mid-'60s.

He's made several albums of experimental electronica under the name The Fireman (the last one in 2008), a challenging record as Twin Freaks with musician/producer The Freelance Hellraiser, and even as part of both Liverpool Sound Collage and the unlikely grouping of Rihanna, McCartney and Kanye West which released FourFiveSeconds in 2015.




So what's wrong with an album with a noted producer of clean, bright and catchy pop like Kurstin, whose other credits include names such as Sia, Lily Allen, Pink and even the musical Annie? Absolutely nothing.

In any case, he's Sir Paul McCartney who can do what he wants, laugh all you like.



Image result for paul mccartney laugh 2017


lunes, 27 de marzo de 2017

Ringo Starr Announces Fall 2017 Tour Dates




ultimateclassicrock.com
Ringo Starr Announces Fall 2017 Tour Dates
By Michael Gallucci 
March 27, 2017

Ringo Starr & His All-Starr Band In Concert At The Palms
Ethan Miller, Getty Images

Ringo Starr is heading back on the road with his All-Starr Band this fall.
The former Beatles drummer and his star-studded group have announced almost 20 dates starting on Oct. 13 in Las Vegas and winding down nearly a month later with a show in Newark. In between, they’ll play concerts in Austin, Atlanta and New York City, among other U.S. dates.

Almost half of the concerts will take place as part of a limited engagement at the Planet Hollywood Resort & Casino in Las Vegas. Starr and his band — which includes Todd Rundgren, Gregg Rolie, Steve Lukather, Richard Page, Warren Ham and Gregg Bissonette — will then head to Texas for a trio of shows.

You can see the entire run of shows below.

This All-Starr Band lineup has been around since 2012 and have been Starr’s touring band ever since. “The dream is still unfolding,” Starr said in a press release announcing the new shows. “I love to play, and I love to play with this band. I can’t say that enough, and we’re on the road again.”

Starr was most recently in the studio with his old bandmate Paul McCartney to record a song reportedly for Starr’s next album. His last solo album, Postcards From Paradise, was released in 2015.

Ringo Starr and His All-Starr Band Tour Dates

Oct. 13-14, 17, 20-21, 24, 27-28 – Las Vegas, NV @ Planet Hollywood Resort & Casino
Oct. 30 – El Paso, TX @ Abraham Chavez Theatre
Oct. 31 – Austin TX @ Moody Theater
Nov. 2 – Sugarland, TX @ Smart Sugarland Civic Center
Nov. 4 – Thackerville, OK @ Global Events Center at Winstar
Nov. 7-8 – Ft Lauderdale, FL @ Parker Playhouse
Nov. 11 – Atlanta, GA @ Fox Theater
Nov. 12 – Norfolk, VA @ ODU Pavilion
Nov. 14 – Morristown, NJ @ Mayo Performing Arts Center
Nov. 15 – New York City, NY @ Beacon Theater
Nov. 16 – Newark, NJ @ New Jersey Performing Arts Center



Ringo Starr's 10 Most Historic Moments






July 7, 1940: Ringo Starr is Born
Born Richard Starkey, Starr became interested in music after a lengthy period of illnesses – including bouts of appendicitis and pleurisy – which began at the age of 13. Into his teen years, Ringo (then known as Ritchie) started playing skiffle before switching to rock 'n' roll as it swept through England in the '50s. (See more of Ringo's photographs here.)


March 25, 1959: Rises to Local Fame
After a series of groups, including the Eddie Miles Band, Starr debuted with the Raving Texans, a backing band for local singer Rory Storm that evolved into the Hurricanes. During this period, Starkey became known as Ringo Starr (in honor of both his rings and his emerging star power), eventually drawing the notice of his future bandmates in the Beatles.



Aug. 14, 1962: Joins the Beatles
Starr first met the Beatles in Hamburg, Germany, in 1960, while still performing with Rory Storm and the Hurricanes. As time went on, they asked him to sit in during sets when original drummer Pete Best was unavailable. By the summer of 1962, producer George Martin had become certain the Beatles needed to replace Best. The Beatles knew just whom to call.


Feb. 11, 1963: His First Vocal
"Boys" was written for the Shirelles but had become such a familiar set list item by the time the Beatles convened for this session that they nailed the final take in just one try. "Boys" actually predates Starr's time in the band: It was originally used as Pete Best's spotlight moment. Starr had also performed the song with Rory Storm.


July 6, 1964: A Starr Turn in 'Hard Day's Night'
Released to capitalize on Beatlemania, which was sweeping the globe, 'A Hard Day's Night' did more than fictionalize a day in the life of the group. It made Starr, who was featured in a memorable solo stroll in the movie, a star in his own right. The film arrived amid a flurry of achievements, including the Beatles' celebrated performance on 'The Ed Sullivan Show' and a record six No. 1 singles in one calendar year.


March 27, 1970: Starr's Solo Career Begins
Starr got off to a prolific start as the Beatles began disintegrating. 'Sentimental Journey,' a nostalgic take on mid-century standards, arrived first – followed later in 1970 by 'Beaucoups of Blues,' which showcased Starr's love of country music. He follow that with the Top 5 single "It Don't Come Easy," recorded with George Harrison.


Nov. 2, 1973: His Biggest Album Ever
Starr, the ultimate glue guy, orchestrated the closest thing we ever got to a Beatles reunion – and together they created his bestselling album. Home to a pair of chart-topping songs, 'Ringo' featured pals George Harrison, John Lennon and Paul McCartney, and a cover that brought to mind their classic collaboration 'Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band.'


April 17, 1981: A Second Career, A Lasting Love
Starr leveraged his Beatles-era movie triumphs into a second career in film and, as fate would have it, into a life-long marriage. Starr met actress Barbara Bach on-set during the 1980 filming of 'Caveman,' five years after divorcing first wife Maureen Cox. Starr and Bach were married weeks following 'Caveman''s premiere.


July 23, 1989: Forms the All-Starr Band
Starr's concert supergroup, featuring shifting personnel who share the stage and set lists, began with a lineup that included future brother-in-law Joe Walsh, the E Street Band's Nils Lofgren and Clarence Clemons, Billy Preston (pictured) and the Band's Rick Danko and Levon Helm, Dr. John and Jim Keltner. Typical sets include Starr-sung Beatles and solo favorites, mixed with hits from his famous guests.


April 18, 2015: A Belated Hall of Fame Honor
Though he scored several solo hits during the early days of the Beatles breakup, Starr was the last major figure associated with the group to be separately honored. John Lennon entered in 1994, Paul McCartney in 1999 and George Harrison in 2004. Producer George Martin was recognized in 1999; their late manager Brian Epstein was honored in 2014. The Beatles went in as a group in 1988.

sábado, 25 de marzo de 2017

Paul McCartney says he and John Lennon penned their best Beatles hits while sat ‘opposite each other on twin beds’

Image result for paul mccartney writing with john lennon


www.dailymail.co.uk
‘I wrote my best hits in my bedroom’: Paul McCartney says he and John Lennon penned their best Beatles hits while sat ‘opposite each other on twin beds’ 
° The Beatles star said he and Lennon would 'spin off each other' 
° It felt like he was 'looking in a mirror' when Lennon was sitting opposite
° Sir Paul and Lennon formed one of the most successful collaborations in history
° Sir Paul said he could ‘never have a better collaborator’ then Lennon
By Laura Lambert Tv And Radio Reporter For The Daily Mail
PUBLISHED: 25 March 2017

Sir Paul McCartney has revealed that he and John Lennon wrote their best tracks while sitting ‘opposite each other on twin beds’.
The Beatles star recalled moments where the two of them would ‘spin off each other’ as they came up with new melodies.
Asked about his experience of writing music, the 74-year-old, who formed the Beatles in 1960 with Lennon, George Harrison and Ringo Starr, said: ‘There’s a million ways to write, but the way I always used to write was with John and it would be across from each other, either in a hotel bedroom on the twin beds, with an acoustic guitar and we’re just looking at each other.

Sir Paul (left) said it was 'always my big memory' seeing John Lennon (right) come up with melodies in front of him
Sir Paul (left) said it was 'always my big memory' seeing John Lennon (right) come up with melodies in front of him

‘He’d make up something, I’d make up something and we’d just spin off each other.
‘It’s always my big memory, is seeing John there, him being right-handed, me being left-handed, it felt to me like I was looking in a mirror.’

He said that the reason they worked so well together was because they had grown up together, and therefore had ‘developed a way of working’.
Such was his fondness for that method that when it came to writing his final album of the 80s, Flowers In The Dirt, with Elvis Costello, he did the same.
Speaking to DJ Matt Everitt on BBC Radio 6 Music, he said: ‘But it was a great way to work and because we were kids together, and we’d known each other since our teenage years, we’d developed a way of working that would be one of us would start an idea, and the other one would spin off it.

Sir Paul was so fond of his method that he replicated it writing his final 80s album with Elvis Costello 
Sir Paul was so fond of his method that he replicated it writing his final 80s album with Elvis Costello 

‘Obviously, it was very successful. So that was a way I had learned to write and it was the way I liked to write and Elvis was very happy to work like that. So it was like a repeat of that process, and so he was John, basically, and I was Paul.’
The songwriting partnership between Lennon and Sir Paul is one of the most successful collaborations in history.
The partnership was different to most others in that both Lennon and Sir Paul wrote words and music.

The Beatles released 12 albums between 1963 and 1970 and have more number one albums then any other British group
The Beatles released 12 albums between 1963 and 1970 and have more number one albums then any other British group

The Beatles released 12 albums between 1963 and 1970 and have had more British number one albums and singles than any other group.
Speaking of working alongside Lennon, Sir Paul said he could ‘never have a better collaborator’.
‘That is just a fact’, he added.
‘So I don’t try and escape it. I just know there’s no way I can find someone now who’s going to write better stuff with me than I wrote with John.’

Sir Paul is worried his new album is going to be 'the flavour of the month'
Sir Paul is worried his new album is going to be 'the flavour of the month'

Sir Paul went on to discuss the new album he has been working on with Adele’s producer Greg Kurstin, but said he is concerned people will think he is ‘going with the flavour of the month’.
He said: ‘I’m making a new album which is great fun. I’m working with a producer I first worked with two years ago on a piece of music I’m doing for an animated film. Since then, he went on to work with Beck and got album of the year with Beck.
‘Then he went on to work with Adele and has just got song of the year, record of the year, with Adele, and just got producer of the year. So my only worry is, people are going to go, “Oh, there’s Paul going with the flavour of the month”.’


Image result for paul mccartney writing with john lennon

'Flowers In The Dirt' Out Now!

www.PaulMcCartney.com


MAR
24
2017

'Flowers In The Dirt' Out Now!

'Flowers In The Dirt' Out Now!
THE 2017 REISSUE OF PAUL'S 1989 INTERNATIONAL #1 ALBUM - FLOWERS IN THE DIRT  - IS OUT NOW!
The Paul McCartney Archive Collection release of Flowers In The Dirt was, as always, personally supervised by Paul himself and is available in the following formats: 3CD+DVD Deluxe Edition, 2CD Special Edition, 2LP Vinyl and Digital.

For full album details click HERE! 
Fans can purchase their copy of Flowers In The Dirt at their local record store, or online via the below links:
Flowers in The Dirt is also available to stream through the following platforms:
Check out the Deluxe Edition in the video below:





DIGITAL DOWNLOADS
If you purchased Flowers In The Dirt with a download card (Deluxe Edition and Vinyl), you can download the album HERE! To get your download simply enter the redemption code printed on the card.

Directions for digital download:

A) Please enter the unique code on your card in the 'enter code here' box and click 'Submit'
B) Please select the download button icon next to each item. Hi-Res download from Deluxe Edition: Due to the size of the music files all tracks should be downloaded individually. Attempting to download more than one file at a time could cause your download to fail
C) Once downloaded, save your files to the location on your computer where you keep your music and enjoy!

PLEASE NOTE: Music download will only work on a desktop / laptop computer.


viernes, 24 de marzo de 2017

Paul McCartney working on new LP with Greg Kurstin

www.list.co.uk
Paul McCartney working on new LP with Greg Kurstin
Sir Paul McCartney has confirmed he's working on his next record with legendary producer Greg Kurstin
Source: Bang Showbiz
Date: 24 March 2017

Macca performing at Desert Trip
Paul McCartney

Sir Paul McCartney is working with Adele's producer Greg Kurstin on his new album.

The 74-year-old Beatles legend is currently halfway through his first record since 2013's 'New' and while he is thrilled to be working with Kurstin - who worked on Adele's '25' and Beck's 'Morning Phase' - he's worried that will people will think he's chosen Greg because he is the "flavour of the month".

Speaking BBC 6 Music, he revealed: "I'm making a new album which is great fun. I'm in the middle of that. I'm working with a producer I first worked with two years ago on a piece of music I'm doing for an animated film. Since then, he went on to work with Beck and got Best Album of the Year with Beck. Then he went on to work with Adele and has just got Song of the Year, Record of the Year, with Adele, of course and just got Producer of the Year. So my only worry is, people are going to go, 'Oh there's Paul going with the flavour of the month'. But he's a great guy called Greg Kurstin and he's very musical and he's great to work with. So I'm in the middle of that and then shortly, in a couple of weeks, I go off to Japan to do some concerts there in Tokyo which should be great fun. So yeah, I'm at it. Beavering away doing what I love to do. As Ringo says,'It's what we do.'"

Though the 'Let It Be' hitmaker didn't divulge whether there are any collaborations on the new album, McCartney said that despite duetting with Kanye West, Rihanna, Michael Jackson and many more, none of them will be better than his late bandmate John Lennon.

He said: "My thing with collaboration, I know I can never have a better collaborator than John. That is just a fact. It's inescapable. So I don't try and escape it. I just know there's no way I can find someone now who's going to write better stuff with me than I wrote with John. But having said that, I'm interested in working with other people because they bring their own particular thing to it and, it's interesting. It's educational for me to see how they want to work."











www.bbc.co.uk
Sir Paul McCartney talks to 6 Music about collaborations, Chuck Berry, his new album and his own musical legacy.

McCartney’s final album of the ‘80s ‘Flowers In The Dirt’ is regarded as one of his best of the decade. He teamed up with new musicians, new producers, a new song-writing partner in the form of Elvis Costello, it inspired his first world tour in ten years. Now, as the record is re-released (complete with previously unheard demos) he’s spoken to BBC 6 Music’s Matt Everitt about the record, the similarities between writing with Costello and John Lennon, and his experiences collaboration with Stevie Wonder, Michael Jackson and Kayne West.

He also discusses, for the first time, his own new album, the impact of Chuck Berry and his own feelings about how his work will down in history.

Release date: 23 March 2017
Duration:
22 minutes






jueves, 23 de marzo de 2017

Paul McCartney on Lennon, Kanye and his own musical legacy

www.bbc.com

Sir Paul McCartney on Lennon, Kanye and his own musical legacy

Sir Paul McCartney


Sir Paul McCartney's final album of the '80s, Flowers in the Dirt, is regarded as one of his best of the decade.
He teamed up with new musicians, new producers and a new songwriting partner in the form of Elvis Costello and it inspired his first world tour in 10 years.
Now, as the record is re-released, complete with previously unheard demos, Sir Paul speaks to BBC 6 Music's Matt Everitt about collaborating with Costello, Kanye West and Michael Jackson - but why he'll never work with anyone better than John Lennon.
Sir Paul also reveals he's working on a new album with Adele's producer, and what he thinks his musical legacy will be.
Do you learn something from every person that you collaborate with?
My thing with collaboration, I know I can never have a better collaborator than John. That is just a fact. So I don't try and escape it. I just know there's no way I can find someone now who's going to write better stuff with me than I wrote with John. But having said that, I'm interested in working with other people because they bring their own particular thing to it.
If you're thinking of someone like Stevie (Wonder), he works by just making something up on his keyboards. You invite him to dinner, he shows up 10 hours later because he was fiddling around on his keyboard. He's such a musical monster and such a genius, that's what you learn from him.
Michael Jackson, we just sat upstairs in this office and I tinkled on the piano and we just made up a song there. Now with Kanye, I had no idea what was going to happen because I knew it wasn't going to be two acoustic guitars opposite each other. So I thought, 'Well, here goes nothing'.
The one provision I said to everyone, I said, 'Look, if I feel this doesn't work out, then we just won't tell anyone. Kanye who? I didn't work with him!'
Paul McCartney, Rihanna and Kanye WestImage copyright
Image captionKanye West, Rihanna and Sir Paul collaborated on 2015's FourFiveSeconds
I just was myself and I told Kanye various stories that had inspired me musically. One of them was how the song Let It Be arrived, which was through a dream I'd had in which I'd seen my mother, who had died 10 years previously.
But I was so inspired by that that I wrote the song. I told Kanye that, because he'd lost his mother. So then he wrote a song called Only One when I was just noodling around on the electronic piano. So he got the melody, I put the chords in and the style and that's how it happened.
Did you go into Flowers In The Dirt feeling like it was kind of a bit of a reset?
I think so. I'm just bringing up my family, and then a point will arrive where I just think, 'OK, I've got some songs. I should get busy, I should record these. We should go out on tour. It's time'.
And that's what happened round about that time. It was suggested to me that I work with Elvis Costello as a partnership and it seemed like a good idea. I thought, 'Well, he's from Liverpool, he's good' - which helps - and we have a lot of things in common and so I thought, 'Well that could work'.
Elvis Costello and Sir Paul McCartney
Image captionSir Paul said he worked with Elvis Costello in a similar way to how he had worked with John Lennon
Was it writing nose-to-nose? Two acoustics, strumming at each other?
There's a million ways to write, but the way I always used to write was with John and it would be across from each other, either in a hotel bedroom on the twin beds, with an acoustic guitar and we're just looking at each other. He'd make up something, I'd make up something and we'd just spin off each other. The nice thing for me is seeing John there, him being right-handed, me being left-handed, it felt to me like I was looking in a mirror.
Obviously, it was very successful. So that was a way I had learned to write and it was the way I liked to write and Elvis was very happy to work like that. So it was like a repeat of that process, and so he was John, basically, and I was Paul.
I have to ask you about Chuck Berry. Obviously a massive musical hero of yours. What was he like? Did you work with him much?
I didn't work with Chuck. I met him. He came to one of our concerts when we were playing in St. Louis, his home town, and he came round backstage. It was great to meet him and just be able to tell him what a fan I was.
When I think back to being in Liverpool pre-Beatles, when we were all just kids learning the guitar with the dreams of the future, we suddenly heard this little thing, Sweet Little Sixteen. We never heard anything like that, and then when Johnny B. Goode came along, all of his fantastic songs, Maybellene. All these songs about cars, teenagers, rock 'n roll music, was just so thrilling.
Sir Paul McCartney and Matt Everitt
Image captionPaul McCartney with BBC 6 Music's Matt Everitt
Looking at the wave of tributes that followed Chuck Berry's death, do you ever wonder how are you going to be remembered?
I think you do and you put it out your mind. I don't get into it, really. I remember John once, saying to me, 'I wonder how I'll be remembered. Will they remember me well?'. And I had to reassure him. I said, 'Look at me. You are going to be so remembered, you've done so much great stuff'. But it was funny - you wouldn't think John would even have a remote bit of insecurity about it. But I think people do. Luckily, it won't matter because I won't be here.
On a more positive note, what's next?
I'm making a new album which is great fun. I'm working with a producer I first worked with two years ago on a piece of music I'm doing for an animated film. Since then, he went on to work with Beck and got album of the year with Beck. Then he went on to work with Adele and has just got song of the year, record of the year, with Adele, and just got producer of the year.
So my only worry is, people are going to go, 'Oh, there's Paul going with the flavour of the month'. But he's a great guy called Greg Kurstin and he's great to work with. So yeah, I'm at it. Beavering away, doing what I love to do. As Ringo says, 'It's what we do'.
To hear the whole of Matt Everitt's interview with Paul, listen back to the BBC 6 Music Breakfast Show, broadcast on Thursday morning.
The reissue of Flowers in the Dirt is out on Friday, 24 March.


Image result for paul mccartney recording flowers in the dirt


miércoles, 22 de marzo de 2017

Paul McCartney Shares Intimate Memories of Recording Flowers in the Dirt

people.com
Behind the Songs: Paul McCartney Shares Intimate Memories of Recording Flowers in the Dirt
BY JORDAN RUNTAGH
POSTED ON MARCH 22, 2017 




By the late-1980s, Paul McCartney may have been the only artist on the planet uninterested in sounding like the Beatles. But then his new collaborator, fellow British superstar Elvis Costello, reunited him with an old friend: his iconic violin-shaped Hofner bass. The instrument had last seen action during the band’s final live performance on the roof of their London offices almost two decades before, and a faded setlist from their last tour remained affixed to the side with yellowed scotch tape. “He was a big Beatles fan and said, ‘Hey, do you still use your Hofner?’” McCartney tells PEOPLE exclusively. “I had semi-retired it. But he said I should get it out, and I rediscovered it.”

In doing so, he rediscovered his voice. After several years of exploring the latest synth-pop trends with mixed commercial success, McCartney got back to where he once belonged on his 1989 album Flowers in the Dirt. The four tracks co-written with Costello at McCartney’s Hog Hill Mill studios in rural Sussex, England, formed the foundation of his most vibrant and daring work in years. In preparation of an extensive reissue featuring unheard demos and rare session outtakes due out March 24, McCartney spoke to PEOPLE about the album’s creation.




Sitting nose to nose with Costello—a guitar-wielding, bespectacled, sharp-tongued Liverpudlian—surely brought McCartney a twinge of déjà vu. Though he had briefly collaborated with a handful of writers, this was arguably the most substantial working relationship since his partnership with John Lennon. It’s a comparison that McCartney found understandably unnerving in the wake of his former bandmate’s death in 1980. Costello, a card-carrying member of the Fab Four fan club in his youth, couldn’t resist nudging McCartney towards the sound he had helped engineer: intricate sky-high harmonies, splashes of shimmering guitars, melodically adventurous bass lines — and that tune.

It’s the last one that will continue to baffle fans and music makers alike. In conversation, McCartney, 74, has a charming way of demystifying their creative process. “We’d go upstairs with a couple acoustic guitars, sit down, get a cup of tea, grab a pad and say, ‘Well, what’s an idea, boy?’ ‘I don’t know, what about this?’ ‘That’s good.’ It just flowed, the whole thing.” Sound simple? It is if you’re Paul McCartney.

Read on as the icon goes track by track through the album’s highlights, sharing memories of writing with Costello, growing up with his father in Liverpool, making music with the Beatles, and happy times with his late wife, Linda.



“My Brave Face”

“I remember meeting up with Elvis and thinking, ‘Can we hit it off writing together?’ But we did, we enjoyed our time together. ‘My Brave Face’ was one of the early things we did, and it became a single. I felt that Elvis was pulling it in a little bit of a Beatle-y way—a Beatle-ist direction—but it was fine by me. And then I remember the video was quite crazy: some guy trying to steal my Hofner bass.”

McCartney’s 1963 Hofner 500/1 ‘violin’ bass, with scotch tape attaching the 1966 tour setlist visible (it’s since been removed). 

“Rough Ride”

“I had wanted to work with [’80s super-producers] Trevor Horn and Steve Lipson, and this was the first occasion. They came down to my studio [Hog Hill Mill] and we just cooked this little song up. I liked the feel of it. I thought it had a contemporary feel at the time, and a little bit of urban slick that I liked.
It was a great experience working with them—they’re very thorough. I was showing Trevor the view of the English Channel and the coast outside the window of my studio and saying, ‘Wow, look at that!’ He said, ‘No, there’s the view!’ and he points to the speaker. [laughs] I saw his point. We ended up closing the windows and getting into the music. Steve was great to work with, too. He’s a great engineer and musician. So the two of them together, it was a pleasure.”
The song also features multi-instrumentalist McCartney taking a turn on the drums, which he mastered during the early days of the Beatles. 
“I have a kit, which is based on Ringo’s. I figure I can’t go far wrong with a kit like his! It’s lovely, I always like a chance to get on the kit.”

Costello, McCartney, and the Hofner, performing at the Concert for Linda in 1999.

“You Want Her Too”

“That was from the Elvis batch. He’s a great guy to work with, very focused. When you’re working with someone—instead of just sitting around and thinking, ‘Oh, what are we going to do?’—it’s nice when someone comes up with something and you get a kickstart. Elvis was good at that. He would come up and we’d talk stories about his Auntie Irene and various relatives of his and mine growing up in Liverpool. This song came out of that. It’s got sort of a sea-shanty feel. We didn’t take long to write them, they just kind of fell out.”
“That’s a good old trick. We both love the art of songwriting, we’re still intrigued by it. Little things like having a cynical answer to a line—that’s the kind of thing I did a long time ago, like in [the 1967 Beatles song] ‘Getting Better’ where I sing, ‘It’s getting better all the time,’ and John sings, ‘It couldn’t get much worse.’ Otherwise you’re just writing a song straightforward. That’s good too, but it’s kind of nice to have little things that bounce off each other, that yin-yang thing.”

“Distractions”

“That’s one of my favorites. I got in touch with this guy called Clare Fischer, who I thought was a woman with the name Clare. I just knew of the person’s work off of a Prince album [1986’s Parade], where I heard a really nice arrangement. When I’d written this song I thought, ‘It would be really nice to have a really good arrangement, slightly jazz tinged but not too much.’ So I got in touch with Clare, and I was quite surprised to find out that he was a middle-aged man. [laughs] But he was great—a bit of a genius. He and I talked about it a lot and he got the idea. I really liked that arrangement.
Sometimes you hit a lyric that means something to you. For me, if you love someone, you really want to just hang out with them all the time and then just have the best time and the best life. But then you’ve got to go to work, you’ve got to do this, you’ve got to do that. So I just call all of those things distractions.”


The McCartneys on their wedding day, March 12, 1969, outside London’s Marylebone Registry Office.

“We Got Married”

“It’s a pretty little song, heartfelt. It’s not totally autobiographical but it captures being first married, first in love like Linda and I were. We didn’t get a flat together, little details like that are me as a songwriter just throwing in stuff that feels good. But basically it’s our life story, me and Linda. I have great memories of it, because it reminds me of her. It’s a song about getting married and the thrill of it—the first bloom of that for me is encapsulated in the song. The great thing was Dave Gilmour [of Pink Floyd] agreed to play guitar on it. That was really nice, I thought he did a great job on guitar. Very soulful.”

“Put It There”

“That’s an expression my dad used to say. He was an old-fashioned Liverpool guy with a very good sense of humor, and he was always coming out with weird phrases. It was as if he thought it was a bit boring to talk in normal phrases, so he’d always say, ‘Put it there if it weighs a ton!’ And you’d go, ‘Oh … he means shake hands.’ I grew up with that, and all sorts of other expressions—some that don’t lend themselves to songs. But I thought that one would be nice about a father and his young boy, because it reminded me of my dad.
Some of his expressions you really wouldn’t want to use! Sometimes me and my brother would ask questions: ‘Why? Why is that? What’s the reason for that?’ And he’d go, ‘Because there’s no hairs on a seagull’s chest.’ Which is true, but not a satisfactory answer!”
McCartney once again laid down the rhythm on the track, but with an unusual twist. 


“There’s a little hand-slappy thing. That’s something we first heard on Buddy Holly’s record, a great old favorite of ours when we were growing up. He does a record called ‘Everyday.’ It’s a cute little song, a great little song, and there’s this tapping on it [demonstrates]. The story was that it was him tapping on his jeans. And if you ever do that and want to get that effect, don’t wear sweatpants or regular trousers. Jeans are what you need, they’ve got the right tone. That’s just a hint for you and your readers, should you ever be called on to a thigh-slapping session.”

“Figure of Eight”

“I liked the philosophy behind the lyrics of this song. I like the idea of not being caught in a figure of eight. Better to love than give in to hate, which now sounds to me like the U.S. elections.”

“This One”

“That’s completely silly wordplay. My dad was very into words and crosswords and things, and so was I at school. And then becoming a songwriter I was interested in wordplay. So when I heard someone say, ‘This one,’ I thought it could also be ‘this swan.’ I liked this image of a swan, like in Hindu art—Krishna and the swan gliding over water lilies. I was attracted to that image, so that’s what it became, using the two meanings of the word. And then the video by Tim Pope turned out that way, too.”

“That Day Is Done”

“Elvis was talking about a relative one day. We’d have some great conversations: ‘My god, this crazy old uncle of mine…’ ‘Well, there’s this crazy old uncle I’ve got who did this…’ I think this song originally came from Elvis telling the story of the funeral of his aunt [Costello writes in his 2015 memoir that it was his grandmother] and the effect it had on him. He had the idea on that one—so it was my pleasure to just go along and help write the song with him.”




Image result for paul mccartney 1990 live