domingo, 23 de octubre de 2016

RINGO IS ON THE RUN . . . AGAIN (Oct 2016)

RINGO STARR AND HIS LONGEST RUNNING ALL STARR BAND CONTINUE WITH NEW DATES THIS FALL IN NORTH AMERICA, JAPAN AND SOUTH KOREA

Oct 15 Snoqualmie Casino, Sonqualmie, WA
Oct 16 INB Performing Arts Center, Spokane, WA 
Oct 18 Keller Auditorium, Portland, Oregon 
Oct 19 Grand Sierra Casino Theater, Reno, Nevada
Oct 20 Segerstrom Center For The Arts, Costa Mesa, CA 




jackseattle.cbslocal.com
Ringo Starr and His All-Starr Band at Snoqualmie Casino

Snoqualmie Casino, Sonqualmie, WA
Oct 15 2016



GALLERY

Ringo Starr and His All-Starr Band performs at Snoqualmie Casino on October 15, 2016. (Photo by David Conger / davidconger.com)
Ringo Starr and His All-Starr Band performs at Snoqualmie Casino on October 15, 2016. (Photo by David Conger / davidconger.com)

Ringo Starr and His All-Starr Band performs at Snoqualmie Casino on October 15, 2016. (Photo by David Conger / davidconger.com)
Ringo Starr and His All-Starr Band performs at Snoqualmie Casino on October 15, 2016. (Photo by David Conger / davidconger.com)

Ringo Starr and His All-Starr Band performs at Snoqualmie Casino on October 15, 2016. (Photo by David Conger / davidconger.com)
Ringo Starr and His All-Starr Band performs at Snoqualmie Casino on October 15, 2016. (Photo by David Conger / davidconger.com)

Ringo Starr and His All-Starr Band performs at Snoqualmie Casino on October 15, 2016. (Photo by David Conger / davidconger.com)
Ringo Starr and His All-Starr Band performs at Snoqualmie Casino on October 15, 2016. (Photo by David Conger / davidconger.com)

Ringo Starr and His All-Starr Band performs at Snoqualmie Casino on October 15, 2016. (Photo by David Conger / davidconger.com)
Ringo Starr and His All-Starr Band performs at Snoqualmie Casino on October 15, 2016. (Photo by David Conger / davidconger.com)

Ringo Starr and His All-Starr Band performs at Snoqualmie Casino on October 15, 2016. (Photo by David Conger / davidconger.com)
Ringo Starr and His All-Starr Band performs at Snoqualmie Casino on October 15, 2016. (Photo by David Conger / davidconger.com)

Ringo Starr and His All-Starr Band performs at Snoqualmie Casino on October 15, 2016. (Photo by David Conger / davidconger.com)
Ringo Starr and His All-Starr Band performs at Snoqualmie Casino on October 15, 2016. (Photo by David Conger / davidconger.com)

Ringo Starr and His All-Starr Band performs at Snoqualmie Casino on October 15, 2016. (Photo by David Conger / davidconger.com)
Ringo Starr and His All-Starr Band performs at Snoqualmie Casino on October 15, 2016. (Photo by David Conger / davidconger.com)

Ringo Starr and His All-Starr Band performs at Snoqualmie Casino on October 15, 2016. (Photo by David Conger / davidconger.com)
Ringo Starr and His All-Starr Band performs at Snoqualmie Casino on October 15, 2016. (Photo by David Conger / davidconger.com)

Ringo Starr and His All-Starr Band performs at Snoqualmie Casino on October 15, 2016. (Photo by David Conger / davidconger.com)
Ringo Starr and His All-Starr Band performs at Snoqualmie Casino on October 15, 2016. (Photo by David Conger / davidconger.com)

Ringo Starr and His All-Starr Band performs at Snoqualmie Casino on October 15, 2016. (Photo by David Conger / davidconger.com)
Ringo Starr and His All-Starr Band performs at Snoqualmie Casino on October 15, 2016. (Photo by David Conger / davidconger.com)







www.spokesman.com
Review: Ringo Starr brings his pals to Spokane for a lively, music-filled night
By Carolyn Lamberson
MONDAY, OCT. 17, 2016


Ringo Starr, with his All-Star Band sings "It Don't Come Easy" for the crowd at the INB Performing Arts Center, Sunday, Oct. 16, 2016. (Jesse Tinsley / The Spokesman-Review)

Ringo Starr and His All-Starr Band set up shop at the INB Performing Arts Center on Sunday and, in two hours and some change, blasted through an odd mix of songs that had no business working, but somehow did.

Starr, as he’s done since 1989, has gathered some talented friends and headed on the road. The format is simple: Starr performs tunes from his past – hits and songs recorded with the Beatles – and his bandmates get the same consideration. So we hear “Yellow Submarine” followed up by “Black Magic Woman,” and “Hold the Line” leading into “Photograph.”

In my head, I know there’s no way this set list should work. Seeing it performed live? It totally works.

What makes it work? The musicians performing them are deeply talented: singer-guitarist Todd Rundgren, singer-guitarist Steve Lukather (Toto), Gregg Rolie (Santana) on the organ, singer-bassist Richard Page (Mr. Mister), with sax and additional keyboards from Warren Ham (Kansas, Badfinger) and drums from Gregg Bissonette (David Lee Roth, Steve Vai). It was clear Sunday night that after nearly five years as All-Starrs, this group still likes playing together.

Of course, Starr is the star. The 76-year-old ex-Beatle bounded on the stage, appearing fit and healthy and ready to rock. He kicked off the show with “Matchbox,” a Carl Perkins tune the Beatles covered in their early days. It has a ’50s rockabilly vibe that set the right tone. He followed up with his 1971 solo hit, “It Don’t Come Easy.” Then there was “What Goes On,” from “Rubber Soul.”

Starr then headed back to the drum kit, where he bobbed his head in true Ringo fashion and backed up his friends. Rundgren sang “I Saw the Light,” Rolie led the band in “Evil Ways,” while Lukather took the lead for “Rosanna.” (Much to the delight of many in the audience. Seems there were a lot of Toto fans in the house.)

Then Page took the mic for the 1980s hit “Kyrie,” followed by Rundgren and “Bang the Drum all Day.”

Starr, singing from the drum kit, took lead vocal duties on “Boys,” a rockin’ old Shirelles tune he performed with the Beatles and his previous band, Rory Storm and the Hurricanes. Then it was to the front of the stage for energetic performances of “Don’t Pass Me By” and “Yellow Submarine,” both as fun as you’d expect them to be.

Starr then took a break as the band launched into a terrific and extended version of “Black Magic Woman.” He was back in short order for delightful versions of “You’re Sixteen, You’re Beautiful (and You’re Mine)” and “Back Off Boogaloo.”

The All-Starr Band packed 25 songs into a little more than two-hour set. There wasn’t too much banter, but Starr cracked a joke or two. At one point, he asked all the women in the audience to cheer. “I just like to hear the screams,” he said. “It’s memories.”

The show really was like a roadshow celebrating the ’60s, ’70s and ’80s, as most of the songs – save the Page single “You Are Mine” – are recognizable to anyone who’s listened to pop radio in the past 50 years. From the crowd-pleasing Toto hits “Africa” and “Hold the Line,” and a fun, funky version of the Tito Puente song (popularized by Santana) “Oye Como Va,” the Utopia song “Love Is the Answer,” and Mr. Mister’s No. 1 hit “Broken Wings,” the second half was a hit parade.

Of course the end was all Ringo. He led the band through a lovely and lively version of “Photograph,” the No. 1 hit he co-wrote with George Harrison. “Act Naturally,” the Buck Owens song the Beatles recorded in 1965, was country-tinged and fun. Then there was “With a Little Help From My Friends,” the Beatles classic that brought the crowd to its feet, where they stood as the show wrapped up with the Plastic Ono Band song “Give Peace a Chance.”

Throughout the show, Starr displayed a voice that seems undiminished by age. He was amiable and energetic. And watching him work the drum kit was a wonder. It’s not every day that an ex-Beatle comes to town. Glad I got to see this one.


GALLERY


Ringo Starr and his All-Star Band, from left, Steve Lukather, saxophonist Warren Ham, drummer Gregg Bissonette, Ringo Starr and bassist Richard Page perform for an appreciative crowd at the INB Performing Arts Center, Sunday, Oct. 16, 2016. (Jesse Tinsley / The Spokesman-Review)


Ringo Starr, with his All-Star Band members drummer Gregg Bissonette and bassist Richard Page, perform for the crowd at the INB Performing Arts Center, Sunday, Oct. 16, 2016. (Jesse Tinsley / The Spokesman-Review)


Ringo Starr, with his All-Star Band sings "It Don't Come Easy" for the crowd at the INB Performing Arts Center, Sunday, Oct. 16, 2016. (Jesse Tinsley / The Spokesman-Review)


Members of Ringo Starr and his All-Star Band, pianist Gregg Rolie, below, and saxophonist Warren Ham, above, perform for an appreciative crowd at the INB Performing Arts Center, Sunday, Oct. 16, 2016. (Jesse Tinsley / The Spokesman-Review)


Ringo Starr and his All-Star Band, from left, pianist Gregg Rolie, multiinstrumentalist Warren Ham, guitarist Steve Lukather, Ringo Starr, drummer Gregg Bissonette, bassist Richard Page and guitarist Todd Rundgren perform for an appreciative crowd at the INB Performing Arts Center, Sunday, Oct. 16, 2016. (Jesse Tinsley / The Spokesman-Review)


Drummer Gregg Bissonette smiles broadly as he plays with Ringo Starr, left, and bassist Richard Page (former lead singer of Mr. Mister) , right, at the INB Performing Arts Center, Sunday, Oct. 16, 2016. (Jesse Tinsley / The Spokesman-Review)


Ringo Starr, with his All-Star Band sings "It Don't Come Easy" for the crowd at the INB Performing Arts Center, Sunday, Oct. 16, 2016. (Jesse Tinsley / The Spokesman-Review)


Ringo Starr, with his All-Star Band sings the Beatles' hit "What Goes On" for the crowd at the INB Performing Arts Center, Sunday, Oct. 16, 2016. Starr said it's the only song written by Lennon, McCartney and Ringo Starr. (Jesse Tinsley / The Spokesman-Review)


Ringo Starr, right, and guitarist Steve Lukather, left, open the show at the INB Performing Arts Center, Sunday, Oct. 16, 2016. (Jesse Tinsley / The Spokesman-Review)


Former Beatle Ringo Starr smiles as the applause rings through the INB Performing Arts Center, Sunday, Oct. 16, 2016 in Spokane. (Jesse Tinsley / The Spokesman-Review)


Ringo Starr, with his All-Star Band, sings the Beatles' hit "What Goes On" for the crowd at the INB Performing Arts Center, Sunday, Oct. 16, 2016. Starr said it's the only song written by Lennon, McCartney and Ringo Starr. (Jesse Tinsley / The Spokesman-Review)









www.oregonlive.com
Ringo Starr in Portland: An All-Starr evening with the Beatles legend
By David Greenwald
The Oregonian/OregonLive
October 19, 2016

One had to wonder, just days after the second weekend of Desert Trip, the California festival that gathered classic rock's mightiest heroes for two era-concluding concerts, why Ringo Starr didn't get the call. He is, after all, still touring and still the essential drummer who made the Beatles the most important musicians of their time—and a good chunk of the time after. Desert Trip was produced by Goldenvoice, the promoters behind Coachella, a festival known for reunions. Why not Ringo and headliner Paul McCartney, together again? It wouldn't be the Beatles and it wouldn't have to be. But it wasn't at all.

That all seems fine by Starr, whose All-Starr Band is its own traveling rock 'n' roll summit. On the third night of its latest tour, the group showed no signs of jealousy or FOMO at Keller Auditorium on Tuesday night. (No mention of old pal Bob Dylan's Nobel Prize win, either, though his "It's All Good" did make the pre-show playlist.) Instead, Starr, in his signature tinted glasses and punk-black pants with a remarkable amount of zippers, was a fountain of dry humor and peace sign gestures. They hadn't come all this way, he explained before "It Don't Come Easy," "to be miserable."

With frontman duties rotating among five singers, the night played out like a peek into Ringo's shuffling iPod. Would you believe the former Beatle loves "Africa" by Toto and Mr. Mister's 1985 hit "Broken Wings"? Because he played drums on them proudly as Steve Lukather and Richard Page, respectively, led their performances and a handful of others. Todd Rundgren (!) handled "I Saw the Light," "Love is the Answer" and "Bang the Drum All Day," former Santana singer Gregg Rolie delivered "Evil Ways," "Black Magic Woman," "Oye Como Va," and all, particularly Lukather and a stage-roaming Rundgren, played with gusto.

"When I joined the Beatles," Starr explained. "I wrote a lot of songs. None of them were recorded—until we got to this one." The band launched into "Don't Pass Me By," but as a band leader, Starr's maintained that supporting role. For this first-time All-Starr attendee, it was a little surreal—O.K., a lot surreal—to hear the '80s hits next to the likes of "With a Little Help from My Friends" and "Yellow Submarine." But it was also a reminder that rock didn't end with the Beatles, and probably the stuff of a more enjoyable evening than, oh, "Ringo Rama" deep cuts. And what a pure, childlike pleasure to hear "Yellow Submarine," a song that turned 50 this year (no nostalgia from Starr on that front) and quite possibly the greatest sing-along song of the century.

Starr did his solo hits, too, tracks such as "Photograph" and "You're Sixteen (You're Beautiful and You're Mine)" though at 76, he could maybe start leaving that one off the setlist. The one flub of the evening came as Starr spotted a sign language interpreter at the front of the stage, bounded over and improvised a nasty joke: "From the bottom of my heart," he began as she passed the word along, and then spouted nonsense syllables. "A-la-la-la," he said.

But the rest of his efforts were as charming and peace-'n'-loving as ever. With a self-deprecating tease, the band introduced "Yellow Submarine" with a few moments of Led Zeppelin's "Stairway to Heaven." At one point, a man from the audience hopped up on stage, surprising Starr and appearing to give him what the musician identified as... condoms. "That was a long time ago," Starr said.

Less joking were the night's numerous jams. His band mates took their share of solos, but not Ringo, ever a team player: he left even the busier fills to fellow drummer Gregg Bissonette. (Sax player Warren Ham, a welcome addition on "Africa" and elsewhere, rounded out the band.) As strong a frontman as Starr can be, the show was built around acknowledging his true calling: "I love to play drums," he said in one of his more sincere exclamations. There seems to be nothing stopping him: during "With a Little Help from My Friends," he started doing jumping jacks. He was having fun.

"We've got another 20 years with (these) guys," he joked, or promised, and then there was that wit again. "We might be playing clubs, though."

On a personal note: this was my second Beatle of 2016, and I don't take that opportunity lightly. Thanks for your readership, your kind words and even the voicemail rants a few of you keep leaving. As Ringo says, peace and love.

And one more note! Apparently Devil's Dill, Portland's best (only?) late-night sandwich shop, whipped up a "boatload" of 'em for Ringo on Tuesday. Hope he ordered the tuna.




-- David Greenwald











www.ocregister.com
Ringo Starr rocks Segerstrom Center
By ERIC MARCHESE
Oct. 21, 2016


Ringo Starr performs at Segerstrom Hall on Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016. (Photo by Kyusung Gong, Orange County Register/SCNG)

When Ringo Starr came to town, the normally staid Segerstrom Hall at Segerstrom Center became a bona fide major rock venue – for one night, anyway.

With his All-Starr Band, the rocker wasn’t just spry for someone age 76 – he was positively youthful, perhaps buoyed by (or responsible for?) the sizzling vibrancy of his bandmates – Steve Lukather, Richard Page and Todd Rundgren (guitar and vocals); Gregg Rolie (organ and vocals); Warren Hamm (sax, piano and percussion); and Gregg Bissonette (drums).

Though Lukather, Rundgren, Page and Rolie were often in the spotlight, the evening showcased everything fans cherish in Ringo – his charming Liverpool accent, disarming personality and genuine enjoyment for his craft, which translated to authentic warmth.

Wearing dark shades and all black (jacket, jeans and a tee-shirt emblazoned with a silver glitter star, a red heart at its center), he treated the crowd of thousands, mostly boomers, as if personal friends visiting him at an intimate nightclub, pointing at various individuals and speaking directly to them.

Ringo headed up half of the evening’s 24 selections, spending much of the time up front with mike in hand and the rest at his upstage center drums, miced for his vocals. For their first number, the rollicking “Matchbox,” Ringo and company were positively on fire.

That was followed by “It Don’t Come Easy,” given a hard-chargin’, full-bodied rock sound, and “What Goes On,” which Ringo introduced as being “the only Beatles song by Lennon, McCartney and Starr,” walked away from his mic, then returned to it to add “and it shoulda been the other way around.”

Along the same lines were his comments about the high-octane “Don’t Pass Me By”: “When I joined The Beatles, I wrote a lot of songs, and we didn’t record any of them – until this one.” Like the All-Starr Band’s performance of “Boys,” it had that distinctive vintage early ’60s Beatles sound.

“Yellow Submarine” and “With a Little Help from My Friends” are so closely associated with Starr, and so universally known and loved, that Ringo turned them into audience singalongs – 3,000 people, from orchestra level to third tier, on their feet, bellowing out the lyrics.

And for a handful of songs – “You’re Sixteen,” “Back Off Boogaloo,” “I Wanna Be Your Man,” “Photograph” and “Act Naturally” – Starr effected a playful, jocular mood, clearly having a great time, a feeling the audience eagerly embraced.

Starr proved extremely generous in doling out stage time to his bandmates, giving Lukather, Rolie, Rundgren and Page three numbers apiece from their former groups, which include Toto and Santana; Hamm added sensational sax playing throughout.

Lukather fronted three of his former band Toto’s hits: “Rosanna,” “Africa” and “Hold The Line.” On each and in most every other song, he contributed sizzling lead guitar work, often in solo passages.

Rundgren was featured in a trio of songs: “Bang the Drum”; “Love Is The Answer,” which he wrote for his band Utopia; and “I Saw The Light,” written for his 1972 album “Something/Anything?”

Before his first number, Rundgren chortled “This is this current group’s fifth year as an act – and if we make it another year, we’ll outlast the Beatles.”

Santana lead singer Rolie handled lead vocals on three of that group’s most popular numbers: “Evil Ways,” “Black Magic Woman” and “Oye Como Va.” Page, lead singer and bassist for Mr. Mister, headed his own number-one singles “Kyrie” and “Broken Wings,” plus the 2011 song “You Are Mine” (Page’s lyrics, Ringo’s music).

But this was clearly Ringo’s band, and a night to celebrate all things Ringo Starr. The brief encore of “Give Peace a Chance” had the audience standing and swaying, singing along and flashing peace signs at the stage – a stance that became commonplace throughout what Starr called the entire evening’s “musical magical moments.”

Ringo Starr and His All-Starr Band

Where: Segerstrom Center for the Arts

When: Oct. 20

GALLERY

Ringo Starr and His All Starr Band performs at Segerstrom Hall on Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016. (Photos by Kyusung Gong, Orange County Register/SCNG)
















No hay comentarios:

Publicar un comentario en la entrada